1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Olympus Pen EPM-1beginner

Discussion in 'Olympus Chat' started by jpgreenwood, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. jpgreenwood

    jpgreenwood Well-Known Member

    Just bought a second hand EPM-1 with 14-40mm lens. I recently took it abroad with me, hoping to get similar results as my Nikon DSLR. I'm somewhat disappointed at the outcome. Lots of the pics are grainy and the auto ISO has set itself at 1600. I'm a typical man and didn't look at the instructions and just fudged my way through it, and ive learnt how to set aperture priority and shutter priority, as well as manual control. I bought a mini tripod and screw on ND8 filter for some silky beach scenes. Still, photos seem to be slightly soft/blurry. It autofocuses super quick, but due to the camera being low to the ground, it was difficult to see the focus point. I wish I bought a better model with tilt screen!!

    Anyway, does anyone have any tips and settings to get the best out of this little camera as I'm sure it can perform much better than ive seen up to now. I think ive worked out how to manually set the ISO to its lowest (200) and hope to get some better results.
     
  2. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    It should be capable of very good results.... I hope there's not a fault with it?

    Certainly start off by setting the ISO to 200, I don't know why it should have gone to ISO1600 if there was plenty of light about.... I picked up an E-PM1 body a good few years ago now, new but no lens as it was the remained of a "split kit" and although it does not get used very much, with the used 14-42 lens that I already had, it produces excellent results in JPG files "out of the camera" like all the PEN range seem to do. It's a bit concerning that you feel all pictures are soft/blurry; are you hand-holding with the ND8 filter or always using it on a tripod with delayed shutter release (self-timer) to avoid motion blur when firing the shutter?

    EDIT: Just a thought, but have you reset all the settings left by the previous owner?
    Do you have an instruction manual, if not try the Olympus UK and/or USA websites to see if you can download one.... failing that also check to see if "Dummies Guide" do a book for the camera; I bought one for the E-PL1 (the first CSC I bought which helped considerably as I found the Olympus manual wasn't that helpful)
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
  3. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Make sure AT is off for those tripod shots
     
  4. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Never use auto ISO, especially on a smaller than APSC sensor, it just can't give great results at 1600. Not sure I'd trust a current sensor that high let alone a two generations ago 12MP. Most cameras seem to me to set auto ISO far to high on basis that camera shake ruins more pictures than graininess does. Agree at 200 it should be all you expect.
     
  5. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    On the other hand - if it's the only way you can think of to get the picture you're after - just go ahead and try it. Worst case you won't like the image and you'll decide to scrap it.
     
  6. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    I have one although it does not get much use these days. I agree that it is capable of taking excellent pictures but it is a good idea to keep the ISO down (as Mike says). Incidentally did you know that it is IR sensitive? You would need a filter that just lets through IR light, and probably a tripod (although in sunlight hand held is very usable)
     
  7. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    Well, I dug my E-PM1 out and have had a play with it, and it does indeed seem very keen to "up the ISO" to 1600 when light levels fall.
    Looks like it is a characteristic of the camera, so 2 main options: (1) Set ISO manually, or (2) limit the upper value of ISO that it will select on Auto ISO to, say, 400
     
  8. jpgreenwood

    jpgreenwood Well-Known Member

    This photo was taken at F9, 28mm, 1/320 sec, at ISO 200. I'm more than happy. Straight out of camera.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017
    RovingMike and Andrew Flannigan like this.
  9. jpgreenwood

    jpgreenwood Well-Known Member

    This photo was taken at F16, 30 second exposure, ISO 200 with a cheap screw on ND16. No editing, straight out of camera. Colours look flat and the whole picture looks really false. Not sure if this is due to the camera or the filter.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. jpgreenwood

    jpgreenwood Well-Known Member

    Straight out of camera, F16, 13 seconds, ISO 200 with the el-cheapo ND16. Again, colours look washy
    [​IMG]
     
  11. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    What do you have for tripod? And is AF turned off ?

    edit. oops sorry I meant image stabilisation of course
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017
  12. jpgreenwood

    jpgreenwood Well-Known Member

    Just a little pound shop table top thingy.
     
  13. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member


    Beg borrows etc. a half decent tripod then turn the IS off and try again making sure to set the two second shutter delay is set
     
  14. jpgreenwood

    jpgreenwood Well-Known Member

    Yep, got the 2 sec delay, cant use a big tripod as I'm travelling with work. Photos on beach are in Africa so cant take big stuff with me, Looking at the IS setting, its on IS 1 which I'm sure reading the manual was the preferred setting. This also has a focal length setting of 48mm. Im using the 14-40mm lens. I'm ok with the sharpness, its the bland, washed out colour that is bothering me.
     
  15. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Got to say they do not look sharp to me. Incidentally I would never use four thirds lenses at f16. Diffraction starts above f8
     
  16. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I always found that my E-P1 handled low contrast situations poorly. I'm sorry to say that I didn't find any solution beyond parting with it.
     
    Craig20264 likes this.
  17. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member


    At F16 diffraction will have reared its ugly head. so you will have certainly increased the depth of field, but sharpness has gone for a burton.
     
  18. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    If you take shots in soft non directional light you must expect the results to be bland and somewhat lifeless.
    Even if you corrected them in software they might be brighter but no better overall.
     
  19. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Since you ask, bit of both I think, but correct the levels, with just a bit of contrast and it comes up well. I don't really understand all this straight out of the camera stuff:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Not really sure what you don't like about this either, unless sand colour is false?

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page