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Nikon 70-300 advice please.

Discussion in 'Lens Matters' started by DaveG40, Jun 27, 2019.

  1. DaveG40

    DaveG40 Well-Known Member


    Well that seems to contradict a lot of what I've heard about the lens vs body anti-shake debate, in my case I guess I've got a good copy of the lens and it's VR is very effective, because as mentioned it's already wiped the floor with every lens I've previously had, I'm off to fairford next month, that will be the true test.
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    As far as I am aware those cameras that have in-body systems will use the lens system if a stabilised lens is attached. This is true of my Fuji XH-1. The main advantage of in-body systems is that lenses can be made smaller/lighter if they don't need IS. I'd think lens based systems tend to win out when focal length > 200 mm or so.
     
  3. DaveG40

    DaveG40 Well-Known Member

    Over the years I've come to realize that ebay isn't always the cheapest, and quite often you order a lens but get a shed, there are some exceptional used retailers out there,I bought the D7100, 35mm and the 70-300 for £562.33 inc delivery, all are in mint condition and came with a years warranty, the lenses came boxed with all caps and hoods, and the camera with everything a new camera would arrive with..

    I know I bought the AF-P and got the ED VR instead but at £162.96 I don't think that's a bad price, considering they go for £200+ on ebay.
     
  4. DaveG40

    DaveG40 Well-Known Member

    Lens weight also hampers in body I.S imho, fit a big 2.8 lens on something like an A37 (small Sony Alpha), and the onboard sss system is gonna have to work hard, whereas in a lens (which can easily weight more than the camera), it has the weight and better balance. e.g with one hand hold the camera by the body and a big lens will make it tilt forward, hold the big lens and it should stay level, yes / no ?
     
  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I don't understand lens weight inhibiting IS but indeed you have to support a camera+ lens at its centre of gravity to have any chance of holding it still. I can't hold any of my Canon gear one-handed so I always support the lens. My smallest/lightest camera/lens is a Fuji XE-2 (rangefinder style) and 18-55mm lens but I hold that by the lens too.
     
  6. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Sorry but lens weight (mass) has nothing to do with IS/VR. It will be harder for you to hold the larger/heavier lens still meaning there will be more work for VR to do but the problem isn't the lens but the mounting (your arms). VR uses movement of either a light weight lens group or the camera's sensor to counteract movement and hold the image steady on the sensor. Mount a longer lens and the sensor in the body doesn't have to work harder because of the mass of the lens but because a small angular movement of a longer focal length lens results in a larger linear displacement of the image than does the same angular displacement of a shorter lens. This is why a dedicated group in the lens can be more effective than moving the sensor for long focal lengths.
     
  7. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    IBIS for long lenses requires huge shifts of the sensor. In lens VR/IS may be better. At shorter focal lengths there probably isn't much in it. IBIS can correct for rotational vibration; In lens VR cannot do so. A hybrid system might get the best of both systems if implemented correctly. This is all a bit moot for now. We are considering lenses for a D7100, not an as yet to be announced Z9.
    All three of the lenses under consideration make good photographs on a D7100. The D7100 is a good camera. I know. I had one. The only reason that I moved from that to D500 was for the AF system that is shared by some very upmarket beasts. The IQ of a D500 and D7100 is much the same. The later D500 in theory wins on dynamic range and the D7100 wins very slightly on resolution. In practice I cannot tell the difference between D7100 shots and D500 shots. There is a law of diminishing returns. Whichever of the three lenses that you have, provided that you have a good example you have a good lens.
     
  8. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Just in case anyone is unfamiliar with the technical terms I used, above, here is a definition.
    Pitch: Rotation about the lateral axis
    Roll: Rotation about the longitudinal axis
    Yaw: Rotation about the vertical axis
    Heave: Motion along the vertical axis
    Sway: Motion along the lateral axis
    Shunt: Motion along the longitudinal axis
     

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