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New Zealand held its general election yesterday.

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by John Farrell, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    The governing party, National, lost 2 seats, leaving it 3 short of a majority. It has a support party, ACT, who have 1 seat. In the old parliament, National also had 2 other support parties. The 3 seats belonging to these parties went to Labour. Labour gained 13 seats, mainly from the Green party and the New Zealand First party, both of whom will be in parliament still.
    The National party will be negotiating with New Zealand First, to become government again. New Zealand First, though, could support a Labour/Green government.
    There are still special and overseas votes to be counted, before the final result. These are expected to favour Labour and the Greens, reducing National's seat numbers.
     
  2. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Yes - I saw a brief summary of the result. We keep an eye on NZ, since we have family there. A couple of weeks ago, I read that Labour was likely to do well, and although they did make considerable gains, it wasn't enough to remove National - leaving a hung-Parliament (or whatever it's called there... ;)).

    It all sounds rather familiar. :rolleyes: Presumably, the DUP can expect a call from the National Party soon, with an offer of a large sum of cash for their support... ;):D
     
  3. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    Yup - we call it a hung parliament. Whoever looks to form the government will have to offer New Zealand First cabinet posts and policy concessions. It is possible that the National party could negotiate a deal with the Greens. New Zealand First have said in the past they would not work with the Greens, but that does not stop them doing a deal with Labour, and having the Greens outside government, but providing confidence and supply.
     
  4. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Hmmmm..... surely NZ First and Labour would be a marriage made in hell? If I've got it right, NZF is approximately equivalent to UKIP in the the UK, and I can't see many in the UK Labour Party being willing to work with UKIP. o_O Of course, the political 'gap' between the two Parties in NZ might be different, compared with here. There's also the possibility that I might be wrong about UK Labour being unwilling to work with UKIP. :eek:o_O

    BTW, my apologies... I've just realised that my joking reference to the DUP might have been lost on you, unless you're an avid follower of the shambles which passes for government in the UK at the moment... ;)
     
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  5. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I do know who the DUP are - I watched the British election with interest. NZF has been in government before, both with Labour, and National. Their campaigning on immigration is more of an exploiting of a "hot button" issue, than a political doctrine. Their leader, Winston Peters, started out in the National party. He is a shrewd and wily politician.
     
  6. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I always have the feeling that NZ is a country where people want to be 'free' to do what they want - but they also want a Government that's right wing enough not to let anyone who thinks differently to have a say.
    A bit like fundamentalist Presbyterians,
     
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  7. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member


    Given where you live do you really want to bait the "Wee Frees"? ;)
     
  8. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    The city I live in, was founded by Free Presbyterian church settlers, in 1848. For a number of years, they were able to maintain their influence (they called the English settlers in the area the "little enemy"). In 1862, though, gold was discovered in Otago, and this brought a rush of new settlers, including - horror of horrors - Irish catholics. These new settlers soon overwhelmed the original Scots influence.
     
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  9. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I don't quite know how to answer this......you assume we all think the same, which is far from the truth.
     
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  10. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I think they know my point of view on all religious nutters!

    John Farrell - what a relief!
     
  11. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Simply a very simplistic assessment and I do appreciate not everyone feels the same. I do have relatives in NZ (and Canada and elsewhere) so my opinions are somewhat biased! ;) I do wonder, though, what the voting population really want? I mean, I'm lost for what my own population wants, so am always seeking answers!
     
  12. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    Oddly enough, my father was a Scot. When I did his family tree, though, I found only one of his grandparents was Scottish - the other 3 were either Irish or of Irish descent.
     
  13. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    There were 384,000 special votes cast, in the election - 15% of the total. The final result, including these, will be announced in 2 weeks. These votes normally favour the Greens, and Labour, and predictions have the National party losing 1 or 2 seats, based on previous election counts.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  14. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    I'm not familiar with the notion of "special" votes... how does that work? At 15% of the total electorate, it certainly represents a significant portion. What are the factors that would mean that these votes normally favour the Greens and Labour?

    Apologies for all the questions - I'm only a casual observer of NZ politics, but I'm genuinely interested. :)
     
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  15. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    Special votes are overseas votes, votes cast by those out of their registered electorate on voting day, votes cast by those who didn't enrol in time ( enrolments closed about 3 weeks before the election, but those eligible could enrol and cast a special vote, up to the day before election day). These voters tend to be younger, and younger people tend to vote left.
    There were advance voting booths open for a fortnight before the election, and 1.4 million people cast advance votes.
     
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  16. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Ok, thanks. Had I thought about it, I suppose I would have guessed... but it's still early(-ish) in the morning here, and no coffee yet... ;)
     
  17. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member


    Is it just me, or does this sound like a very sensible idea we could put to use over here?

    Anyone who can't turn up on the day can just stroll in any time and increase the number of votes.
     
  18. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    You should know by now, that sensible suggestions with regard to our voting system are simply not welcome... ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  19. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    Sorry.


    Won't do it again.

    I'll go and stand in the corner now:D
     
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  20. Footloose

    Footloose Well-Known Member

    There have been exceptions - when commonsense has prevailed - such as people being allowed to vote for the Monster Raving Loony Party etc .....
     

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