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Look Left, Look Right.

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by MJB, Mar 26, 2017.

  1. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    Not the green cross code, but something I've noticed processing my recent birding shots. Irrespective of the image quality, I am attracted more to photos where the subject is facing the viewers right. Is it just me? Is there a reason ?

    [​IMG]blue tit 3 by Martin Bone, on Flickr

    [​IMG]blue tit1 by Martin Bone, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
  2. Craig20264

    Craig20264 Well-Known Member

    I do prefer lead lines in landscapes to come in from the left. Maybe it's something to do with us reading from left to right.
     
  3. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Yes I think that's it. The eye sits nicely on the right third.
     
    Catriona likes this.
  4. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Makes no difference to me, overall composition more important than which way they look.
     
  5. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    I think you may be right, but in these pictures, look at the stances of the birds; in the first, the bird seems alert and happy with life, upright stance, feathers on head slightly erect. Also a more interesting twig and background. In the second, the bird appears to be crouching, making itself small, perhaps trying to avoid a predator and the branches are less interesting and the background more distracting.

    Have you tried flipping them horizontally?

    S
     
  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    For birds the positioning isn't controlled so for me it makes no difference which way the bird faces, more important is the framing and most of the time this is achieved by cropping (I am impressed how close you get - the exif shows 6m) so has some freedom.
     
  7. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    I try to find a location that has heavy footfall of people. Places like the local park, popular footpaths, outdoor seating at caf├ęs or pubs etc. After a while the birds become quite tame and will come close.
     

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