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I've got the Blues.

Discussion in 'Help Team' started by Brian, Jun 18, 2002.

  1. dogbyte

    dogbyte In the Stop Bath

    Re: The Magic of Curves!

    They regularly flagelate themselves over this at www.nikonians.org
    There's a thread here though its about Velia:
    http://www.nikonians.org/dcforum/DCForumID20/117.html
    They've covered Provia as well but I couldn't remember where. I think the upshot was that Velvia can benefit but Provia is best left alone. Also Velvia has got the punchy saturation that magazine editors like whereas Provia is more neutral but gets you more detail in the shadows strangely enough.
    Their room on hardware is quite useful as there are a lot of IV scanner users some of whom are highly accomplished.
    Anyone who visits nikonians and knows all that - sorry to be patronising!

    Pete IRIPN
     
  2. Chris Cool

    Chris Cool Retired

    Re: The Magic of Curves!

    Looks OK to me Brian... well done!

    Chris( please send money saved on filter, so I can buy a Leica :)
     
  3. parisian

    parisian Well-Known Member

    Re: The Magic of Curves!

    What gorgeous whites! The long Tom in the middle of the frame looks as if it has rust round the lens hood fitting. Very reminiscent of a 400mm pre set I once had. I don't know if anyone else used those things but they were remarkably light weight weren't they - basically just a long tube with a bottle bottom at each end. A lot easier to hand hold than todays stuff. And sometimes I even wanted a shot wide open!

    Those whom the Gods wish to destroy, they first make mad/img/wwwthreads/smile.gif
     
  4. Tom2

    Tom2 Active Member

    Re: blueness

    just butting in:)

    I dont know what rollei you're using but I thought i'd just mention, ffordes have got a Bay1 yashica 1A filter in for £10....any use?

    Cheers
    Tom
     
  5. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Re: blueness

    Thank you Tom but the Rollei is a late model F and I think its a bayonet 2. But not being an expert I could be wrong but its got 11 on the lenshood which I suppose is 2. But thanks for looking.


    Slimey CRIPN
     
  6. Burgy

    Burgy In the Stop Bath

    Try Mr Cad, in Croydon, they usually have mountains of unusual equipment , a quick search of their website revaled loads of rollei filters

    Burgy

    Its not what you've got, its who you do it to. http://www.pressfotos.co.uk
     
  7. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Thanks for info Paul, but I have discovered the blue channel so all is well.

    Slimey CRIPN
     
  8. dogbyte

    dogbyte In the Stop Bath

    I was quite suprised that you don't use, or should I say don't appear to use a high quality filter routinely just in case you accidentally knock the front element. Any particular reason?

    Pete IRIPN
     
  9. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Well I don't Pete, I cannot ever remember owning a filter of any kind. Whoops sorry I bought a 25mm from Clive which had a U.V. filter on it when he sent it to me and the thing refuses to come off. And no, I have never damaged a lens in my life. Oh there was the 28mm Elmarit that fell off the camera but no filter would have saved that. Yes and Leitz replaced it free of charge. The reason? I never felt a need before discovering slide film and Leitz do not advocate the use of add on filters.

    Slimey CRIPN
     
  10. dogbyte

    dogbyte In the Stop Bath

    Hope you're not tempting fate having never damaged a lens - I shall feel responsible if anything happens to that new baby due tomorrow morning now!

    I think I would try a Skylight 1B for conditions similar to the example you posted. The reason is that although we've got Photoshop, often the colour correction is more complicated than using just one curve. You may have noticed when using Colour Balance that to reduce a blue caste it sometimes is better to do a litle yellow and a little green, or a little yellow and a little red, rather than a lot of yellow - if you see what I mean. Better to have an original slide that is more or less spot on for me. I did some winter snow shots, got the exposure compensation a bit wrong, and I never could get the images white in Photoshop; they were either too blue or too brown/yellow. The gurus can do it but not me, yet.
    The other main filter, the UV, quote "absorbs the ultraviolet rays which often makes outdoor photography hazy and indistinct" (Hoya). I don't think PS could do much about that at all other than cranking up the contrast and oversharping. This filter might actually give a sharper image than the naked lens in these circumstances I guess.

    Neither the Sky or UV require f stop compensation by the way. The third "big" filter, for more dramatic skies, greener foliage etc, would be the polariser which of course can loose you 2 stops.

    Pete IRIPN
     
  11. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Pete, you have got to remember that as with most things my opinions are based on ignorance. All my life I have been a B/W merchant with an addiction to extreme wide angle lenses. However good they are, a filter placed in front of the lens has to degrade the image, it must. Unless the filter is built to the same degree of excellence as the original lens it has got to introduce problems. Just think of the angle of acceptance of a 19mm lens then think of the distance that light has to travel through even the thinnest filter and you might get my drift. Obviously the longer the focal length of the lens the less glass it has to travel through, hence the problem is reduced. Also being a B/W worker has meant that I could adjust my initial exposure and compensate in the printing stage.

    But now I have switched to colour slide film and the example I posted is my first attempt ever and the dreaded blue cast problem raised its ugly head. So kind people have taken the trouble to point out where I am going wrong, O.K. a filter would cure the problem but so would adjustment in the printing stage, i.e. in fact exactly the same remedy in practice as the one I am used to. In other words compensate in the darkroom. So perhaps you can understand the logic behind the old foggies train of thought.

    As for the lens protection thing I firmly believe in lens caps. It horrifies me to see many photographers wandering around with their lenses exposed to the elements. Likewise I can't remember the last time I cleaned a lens, a lens shouldn't get dirty in the first place.

    However having said all this I am still a firm beleiver in the 'the less you do afterwards the better' so as the new baby has been bought for colour slide work I will get a filter for it and so get rid of the blues.

    Thanks for your interest anyway.


    Slimey CRIPN
     
  12. dogbyte

    dogbyte In the Stop Bath

    Life is full of comprimises eh!
    I'm looking forward to seeing what the 6*9 can do as you've sparked my interest now. You'll have to do a website sometime (don't ask me how) so the images can be viewed a bit better than in the Gallery.

    Pete IRIPN
     
  13. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Can't remember who brought the subject up but yesterday somebody was talking in this forum about scanning film with an Epson 2450. Someone gave a link to a site which dealt with this scanner. The link was excellent, but one thing I noticed was the guy reported a significant blueish and magenta cast with Provia 100F. In fact he said he was going to give up using it because of this. So is this film known for it or not?

    Slimey CRIPN
     
  14. BigWill

    BigWill Gorgeous oversensitive Nikon-loving cream puff

    Inflatable would know the answer to that Bri, but as he's currently on holiday in Canada (having been shagged by a rampant wild grizzly) we're gonna have to wait till he comes back to get an answer, unless some of the other 2,500 odd forum members can come up with a definitive answer? Hello! ......anybody else out there?

    BigWill

    <font color=red>My "get up and go's" "got up and went!"
     
  15. philipbowman

    philipbowman Well-Known Member

    Brian,

    I didn't see that bit on that website, but I have had a similar issue recently (grotty colour using Provia100F and a 2450). I'll try to put some sample pics on my website to show what I mean.

    Phil

    Phil Bowman, Watford

    "Don't point that Moot at me, Moriaty..."
     
  16. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Phil,

    I have just checked and its on page 2 . It's just underneath the big Cambridge picture. He reckons the piccies he took on Astia (never heard of it) are much better.

    Slimey CRIPN
     
  17. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    That Nick is never around when you want him. Anyway he didn't ask my bloody permission to go, just wait till he gets back./img/wwwthreads/frown.gif

    Slimey CRIPN
     
  18. Glenn Harper

    Glenn Harper Well-Known Member

    To the best of my knowledge Brian, Provia 100F has no reputaton for having a blue or magenta cast. Having said that, different people say different things about most films. I've heard a few people say Kodak Extra Colour has either a blue or magenta cast, but I see no such problems with it and continue to use it. I've used one or two rolls of Provia 100F recently, and can see no problem with that either. To me it just looks like a fairly well saturated film, although considerably more neutral than Velvia, with no cast that I can detect.

    Do lens coatings not have an effect over the colour rendition of films ? Just a thought, although my knowledge of lens technology is pretty poor to say the least.

    Sorry I can't offer any greater insight. Perhaps the cooler cast is just something you've noticed having switched from print to slide film Brian. A lot of people use warm-up filters as standard to avoid cold pictures, and of course with slide film the original picture is finite for those that are not using it for prints.

    A UV filter may help as mentioned. Do all of your pictures have a blue cast ? Long distance landscape/cityscape shots are the ones more likely to be blue according to my modest understanding.

    Astia is a very neutral film by Fuji's standards, but is known to be a considerably less sharp film than the main three of their slide films. For that reason, and because generally these days people prefer richly saturated films, Astia is a bit of a poor relation in Fuji's armoury.

    Glenn /img/wwwthreads/smile.gif
     
  19. BigWill

    BigWill Gorgeous oversensitive Nikon-loving cream puff

    I forgot about Glenn Bri, of course we know he is an E6 man par-excellance so I would take whatever he says as gospel. Sod nick, who needs him anyway! (Well the bear does apparently but we can discount that!)

    BigWill

    <font color=red>My "get up and go's" "got up and went!"
     
  20. Glenn Harper

    Glenn Harper Well-Known Member

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