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Is my EOS 5D mk1 a match for the newer technology?

Discussion in 'Help Team' started by les_g, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. les_g

    les_g Well-Known Member

    Hi. I'm thinking of exchanging my Eos 5D mk1 ffor a more up to date model like the Eos 550D which represents very good value.
    My dilemna is whether this would represent improved picture quality over the older technology? How do you think the 5D would stand up to higher pixel count but in a smaller sensor?
    Thanks
     
  2. beejaybee

    beejaybee Marvin

    IMHO the 5D mk 1 is more than a match for any of the newer cameras in terms of sheer image quality. The fancier processors on the newer cameras sort of work most of the time, for averagish subjects, but actually make it more difficult to get useful information out of the sensor, even in raw mode.

    If you really, really need features that are on the more modern cameras, then by all means upgrade - but the logical replacements for the 5D "classic" are the 5D mk II (if you can still find one), 5D mk II or 7D - the 550D is not a bad camera but it feels like a toy in comparison with the 5D.
     
  3. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    If you have not got a rational reason to change then don't change. How long will it be before 5D mk2 owners are selling them for mark3s? I use a cropped sensor myself and my lenses have been bought with that format in mind for several years. You on the other hand have full frame lenses and know how to use them. I changed format when I changed from film to digital. Full frame was not an option so I changed.
    I suggest that you stick with your present format and brand. Upgrade to mark 2 or even mark 3 if you have funds that you feel must be spent. Even then consider lenses instead of a new camera unless you already have the best that money can buy. I don't mean that literally; you are using Cannon aren't you!
     
  4. P_Stoddart

    P_Stoddart Well-Known Member

    Two things the 5D noise ceiling is way higher than the 550D.

    Second you get more DOF control being a FF sensor on the 5D.

    Not critical but final point the 5D is a by many classed a semi-pro where as the 550D is entry level.

    Ok you get extra 5MP with the 550D, but what are you doing with your shots?

    With borders you can do A3 300ppi from the 5D.

    The only negative I can see from the 5D is the lack of live view.
     
  5. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    There are some good reasons to upgrade; in feature terms, for me the sensor cleaning was worth it by itself, also if you wish to shoot video, or require live view, then a more modern machine makes sense.
    If you shoot mainly macro, the increased pixel density of a camera such as the 550D will help. For more general work, though, the larger sensor of the 5d will give you more options.
     
  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The AP review of the three 5D versions was very silent on the original. It observed that fewer lines per mm could be resolved, factually, but that was about that.

    Swapping a full frame for cropped sensor is a major consideration if your interest is landscape, for long telephoto use that maybe different story.

    I bought a second body for longer lens use but I will keep my 5D original until it breaks. The one thing I notice in comparison is the LCD screen on the 5D seems really outdated and I cannot judge critical focus on some pics that I can on the second body, but coming from film days I don't actually mind waiting until I can see it on a computer monitor and tough if it is out of focus - try harder next time. Last weekend there were three sparrow chicks being fed in a buddlia bush in our garden at about 15-20 m from the house. Even the longest lens I had, a 300 f4+1.4, rendered them dots on the LCD and I was convinced I had not got them but viewed at 100% you can count the feathers. Not great pics and the higher pixel count of the mk III would make them better resolved I am sure but the original 5D is still very good and built to take a lot of knocks. If you trade down and enjoy wide angle you will notice the difference. My second body has crop factor 1.3 and I really notice this loss if I use it for general photography.
     
  7. les_g

    les_g Well-Known Member

    Thank you for your replies. Having thought carefully about the points you have made I've decided to keep my 5D and maybe look to upgrade to a Mk2 later, if I can find a good secondhand example at a reasonable price. I do have a collection of Canon & Sigma EF lenses and accessories so it makes sense to stick with a full frame Slr. I guess it is all too easy to get carried away with pixel counts and lpmm charts etc. and think that older models have become inadequate when, in actual fact, the older model continues to take excellent pictures.

    Thanks again for your advice and input.
     
  8. P_Stoddart

    P_Stoddart Well-Known Member

    I think it might be a good way to go. :)

    The 5DMKIII out so there will be some secondhand trade ups out there.

    By many the 5DMKII at time of appearing was considered the best camera ever.

    Considering it's price and full frame 21MP at the time of release.
     
  9. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Wrong, actually: it was 2 1/2 years after it's release - back in November.

    Certainly as one who came from the original 5D, the Mk II is a major step up in just about every area. I kept my original as a back-up, but after just not using it for 2 years, I sold it without regret; the Mk II may or may not be the best camera ever, but it's certainly my favourite camera ever.
     
  10. P_Stoddart

    P_Stoddart Well-Known Member

    Actually I never said the magazine I said many at the time. :rolleyes:

    I have met a few photographers who just love their 5DMKII. :)

    I was think of those. :p

    It certainly presented way better value than the Nikon D3x. I would say Nikon have learned their lesson with the new D800 that's out now.

    Surely you would agree if the OP gets a 5DMKII they will be happy for quite awhile. :D
     
  11. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Sorry, forgot the smiley. :eek:
    Oh absolutely. As I said, it's the best camera I've ever used, and count me in as one who loves it.
     
  12. Alex1994

    Alex1994 Well-Known Member

    I doubt it. I assume that a D4X is in the works, and will be a lot more expensive than the D800.

    Also, the 5D Mark II was much better value than the EOS 1Ds Mark III ! :)
     
  13. eagerbeaver

    eagerbeaver Well-Known Member

    Surely you mean A O V not DOF
     
  14. eagerbeaver

    eagerbeaver Well-Known Member

    What sickened me is the mirror fault, dropping out. For a camera costing £1800 and CANON saying "We used the wrong type of glue" To think I bought one.I find NIKON the best bet now.
     
  15. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    No. I have to write more as it seems I cannot post 2 letters and a full stop.
    For a given focal length the area of view is bigger on the full frame but control of depth of field is greater. If you can get hold of a 6x6 medium format camera with an 80 mm lens (fov about same as 50 mm lens on 35 mm) and a waist level finder you will be utterly amazed at the dof control.
     
  16. eagerbeaver

    eagerbeaver Well-Known Member

    TOSH:D
     
  17. PhilW

    PhilW Well-Known Member

    I assume from the smiley you are joking.

    Because that the larger the format of the sensor the smaller the DOF (for any given aperture/focal length combination) is unarguable fact.
     
  18. Gezza

    Gezza Well-Known Member

    Superglue sorts out the mirror
     
  19. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    which, last time I looked, Canon will still fix for free
     
  20. Mitchell

    Mitchell Well-Known Member

    They do, I just bought a 5D from a 500D in full knowledge of the mirror problem. Canon still have it up on the FAQ page of the 5D webpage.

    It only affected a few batches anyway. I imagine newer models are well clear of the problem.

    Anyone know where the serial number of a 5D can be traced to a date of manufacture?
     

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