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How would you shoot it?

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by EightBitTony, Apr 4, 2017.

  1. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    I think Mike was also talking hypothetically...

    Working a subject is important on two counts - one, to get the best shot, and two, to improve your vision. Not taking a shot is in my book a sign that your vision is pretty well developed.

    All I can see as a potential subject would be a bit of the fence on the right, some blank wall, and a bit of the mural.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  2. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Ah gotcha. But it is a good discussion area anyway. What you can't legislate for it the real left field things that might happen that you would never think up, like the guy walking by in my avatar as I was trying to think of how to shoot a wall full of graffiti.Or the guy lying there staring at the cheese in one I linked. Would never have thought of that.
     
  3. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    In the old days, when you had all of 12/16/20/36 frames to shoot¹, depending on your proclivities², you³ would have thought long and hard before taking the shot and probably got the one you wanted. These days with anything up to several hundred shots possible depending on the size of your memory card, youª tend to shoot off dozens and still not get what you are after.

    Well, I do. :(



    ¹ unless you were someone like Lichfield and bought film by the hundredweight and had an assistant to carry it and load cameras for you!
    ² or preferred film size
    ³ that's a general 'you', not a specific one referring to any poster here, living or zombie!
    ª ditto.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  4. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Tony,

    Which is indeed what I said I'd probably do: see Post 6. But equally, I might not have. I might have decided that this scene couldn't actually be worked in any way I can think of.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  5. lfc1892

    lfc1892 Well-Known Member

    In either pane of graphic there is a broken chain of black shapes. I'd be looking for something to make the chain.
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  6. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Then you must miss a lot of shots. The best shots come from recognising something you would never of thought of when it happens. You just decide a shot might happen and wait. Anything you would have thought of is next level down: predictable.
     
  7. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Just about all things that I pick up my camera for, fall into the bracket of things that caught my eye. Only a few of them are things that are possible to frame in a way that enhances them. So many never become my photographs. Though they may well become someone else's.
     
  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Mike,

    I sometimes wonder if you go out of your way to misunderstand me. Certainly our minds work in very different ways. No, I don't "miss a lot of shots". I just think, and look hard at the subject, before I shoot. If I can't see a picture there, I either don't shoot or (as I said earlier) take a reference shot for future reflection and rumination. What do you do? Just point the camera at random and hold the button down? Of course not; so what on earth are you saying?

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  9. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    I think Terry's point is spot on the button, Roger and Mike:

    You may miss photos that were there for others, you don't miss photos that were "you". Both of you are correct.
     
  10. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    The annoying thing is when you know there is a picture there, but you just can't quite figure out what it is. Even with reference shots.

    Or worse, as I said in another thread, you work out what the shot would be, but other factors make it impossible.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Nick,

    I only "miss" them in the sense that I don't shoot everything indiscriminately and at random: as I say, I think first. I can't quite see any other way of approaching photography.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Steve,

    I completely agree but of course there's the also awful possibility that you "know" there's a picture there -- and you're wrong. You then spend ages trying to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Knowing when to move on is the trick! I've always hated the phrase "Winners never quit." Of course they do, because they know when to cut their losses. That's what makes them winners.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2017
  13. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Yep. Done both. Or possibly all three...
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  14. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    No, Roger, you miss them in the sense that they were never shots you personally might take; that doesn't mean that they're not shots somebody else might not make a success of. Perfectly valid choice.
     
  15. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Nick,

    Then I haven't missed them, surely. Logically, EVERYTHING is a potential picture, even plain blue sky or a square of tarmac, so everything you don't shoot is a missed picture. Of course it may be possible to take a fascinating picture of either (though probably quite difficult) so I can't see what I'm missing by not bothering. At this point, "missed picture" is so broad as to be completely meaningless.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  16. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    No Roger you misunderstand me but I think your knowing when to move point on is the answer. It is not if you can't think how it would work.
     
  17. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Kind of like my "Helping Hands" photos in, either, the Appraisal or Exhibition Gallery, Tony ;)

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  18. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Mike,

    Then when is it?

    You leave when there are no more pictures to be had. Otherwise you'd stay in the same spot for eternity.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  19. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    As of course many landscapers do. There is no point at which there are no more pictures to be had, the best one might be just about to arrive, but there is a point where your patience runs out. Whether you can foresee what might arrive is not the point. But I am not blessed with patience and suspect, like you, I would not have lingered long with the one in question.
     
  20. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Back to the original post. It would be rather fun to enlist the help of a Dalmation owner. Join some doggy spots with a black felt tip pen and take a portrait, using Andy Biggar's advice, with that wall as a backdrop. If you don't get the Andy Biggar reference then the chances are that you are not an AP subscriber.
     
    EightBitTony likes this.

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