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How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge...

Discussion in 'User Reviews' started by AlexDenny, Aug 25, 2015.

  1. AlexDenny

    AlexDenny Well-Known Member

  2. Sejanus.Aelianus

    Sejanus.Aelianus In the Stop Bath

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    Bluidy enormous and it would need a wheelbarrow to move it around, I reckon.

    :D
     
  3. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    You would stand the best chance with one of the CSCs (the larger the crop factor the better) - except that they are not really DSLRs
     
  4. AlexDenny

    AlexDenny Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    I dunno... It came up Snowdon okay...
    [​IMG]

    I'd quite like to try that, but I don't own a CSC to try it with, which makes it tricky... I've always fancied the Olympus OM-D EM-10 having "cut my teeth" on an Olympus OM-10 as a teenager... But as it stands, I'm pretty restricted to testing Canon stuff... :(
     
  5. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    OK lets see what we are up against, the P900 has a 24-2000 equivalent zoom with a maximum aperture of f2.8/6.3

    With a full frame DSLR, such as a Nikon D3 we can get from 24-200 with just two lenses and still keep that f2.8 aperture. From 200 to 2000 is much harder, except that we rarely need much beyond 200 in general use. Above 200 there is the Nikon 200-500 f5.6 then would come the Nikon 800 f5.6 and a 2x converter on that gets us to 1600. To get to 2000 we need to find a Nikon 2000 f11 mirror lens, that alone will cost around £22,000!

    So, it can be done but not for the sub £600 price tag if the P900.

    The kit would consist of 5 lenses and a 2x converter, it wouldn't auto focus above 800mm focal length mainly because at f11 (800 + 2x converter) there wouldn't be sufficient light reaching the focusing sensor. The 2000 f11 is a manual focus lens anyway.

    Cost, buying new around £40,000 with a used 2000 f11.
    Cost used, actually not that much less, around £35,000 because the 200-500 hasn't been around long enough and the 800 and 2000 lenses are so rare that they will hold their prices, or even appreciate.
     
  6. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    Well, first of all you need a DSLR with a sensor the size of a fingernail. Then, when you've successfully disposed of the idea of image quality...

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  7. AlexDenny

    AlexDenny Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    Clearly the sub £600 bit is a non-starter... But I genuinely managed to find a fairly good aray of lenses for less than £1000 (but on an APS-C crop sensor)...

    You're right though, the maximum aperture of the setup on an 18-250mm superzoom is actually worse than the P900, so I guess we should throw in a Canon EF 50mm f/1.8mm for about £50 off ebay into the set, so that you have a decent portrait lens... That bag just keeps on getting bigger and bigger!

    (I cheated of course, because the lenses may be less than £1000, but you would still need to buy a camera body. The cheapest way of getting something coparable to the 16mp of the P900 would probably be a second hand Canon EOS 500D - 15mp, but that's still going to be around £150).
     
  8. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    An interesting exercise but why would anyone want to match the zoom range of the P900?

    I suspect anyone buying one will find the long end very rarely used and disappointing in terms of results unless they use a tripod. How many bridge camera users carry a tripod?

    The vast majority of my images are taken with a 24-70 next comes 14-24 followed by 70-200, some times with a 1.7 converter. I have a 300 f4 but it rarely gets used and the 600 f8 mirror gets even less use. I very much doubt anything longer would be worth the effort, certainly not worth the money, unless I were into African wild life. Having said that I have a picture on my wall of a Lion in a tree that was taken with a 200 f4 on an OM1 in 1980. Somebody said "the best zoom is your legs".
     
  9. Sejanus.Aelianus

    Sejanus.Aelianus In the Stop Bath

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    I think you'd be wrong.

    Sometimes, we need all the reach we can get. I was standing by a bus stop when this suddenly appeared. My Panasonic TZ40, at maximum focal length, just got the shot, with (quite) a bit of cropping...

    [​IMG]
     
  10. PhotoEcosse

    PhotoEcosse Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..


    ....and I agree.

    A zoom range such as offered by the P900 encourages a completely new approach to popular photography and, as countless examples of images taken at the extremes of its zoom range, already posted on this Forum, show, for display on a computer monitor (which, I suspect, is all that is required of 99% of all photographs taken), the image quality is exceptionally suitable.

    I think the answer to the original question might be that a dSLR would be emminently unsuitable (at any cost) for the exciting kind of photography that cameras like the P900 now make possible.
     
  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    ...... and I agree. The wrong word is compete - there is no competition.
     
  12. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    I think that was covered in post #5
     
  13. AlexDenny

    AlexDenny Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    I don't own a P900 but I do use the maximum zoom of my 150-600mm Tamron lens a lot for wildlife, frequently handheld, and get some very nice results.

    I also use it with a 2x teleconverter (on a tripod) for astro work. I have an older bridge camera and I used a tripod with that. Lots of people carry small ones (or at least a beanbag)
     
  14. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Re: How to build a DSLR kit to compete with a superzoom bridge..

    Like Alex I do not have a superzoom and I only have 600mm (equivalent) lens on my Olympus, I almost always use it hand held (the camera has good IBIS) and TBH I think that 600 is where a wildlife lens should start and I would much prefer one with at least twice that range - if I could afford / carry it
     

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