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Hi all

Discussion in 'Introductions...' started by nps, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. Rhys

    Rhys Sasquatch

    I can tell you (hope nps don't mind lol) that he's getting married next year abroad and wants a decent camera to take some memorable pics while away for a few months. Once in a lifetime thing so doesn't want to be disappointed. Main things are doesn't want digi-zoom, has to be optical. Needs to have a good focussing system and good picture quality. The K-30 falls within his budget (just) and fulfils the criteria plus it's weather/dust sealed. Also it's there in case he picks the bug up and starts taking more pics - bonus being he has a decent camera instead of buying something cheaper and having to upgrade later. Anyway, thought I'd just throw that in. The K-30 isn't definite but wants opinions before taking the plunge.
     
  2. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    The K30 should be do you well, then. Just make sure you get the kit with the weather resistant (WR) lens to get the full benefit of the weather sealing.
     
  3. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    Cheers Rhys I couldnt have put it better myself lol

    Im hoping to get a cam in the next few weeks so it gives me time to learn a little of how it works before we go in June

    just another quick question,, if i was to use the camera in auto mode so i dont have to mess with any controls apart from the focus would it still out out perform a point and press cam that most people buy? hope that makes sense
     
  4. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    Good idea. Don't hesitate to come back here with any questions that might arise.

    Generally a DSLR will be better than a compact point & shoot because it has a bigger sensor so it's better at gathering light. This is especially noticeable when taking pictures in poor light. Also, the individual pixels on the sensor are bigger, so they can better cope with a wide range of brightness levels ("dynamic range") - the K30 is especially good at this.

    A DSLR might be not quite as good as a compact in a few very specific situations, e.g. when you want to get everything in focus from very close up out to the horizon. For this, a small sensor is actually an advantage - as long as the light is good enough!

    Of course, you'll get even better results in some situations when you start taking the camera out of auto mode so you can tell it what you want, rather than blindly following the designers' guesses, but those guesses will probably give you a reasonable picture at least 90% of the time. Pentax have what they call "hyper manual mode" which allows you to set things automatically, and then easily tweak it to how you want.
     
  5. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    thanks for the reply Alex, sounds like I'm gonna have some fun with the camera

    another question lol
    it says the camera isnt wi-fi, but some of the other cameras ive read about are eye-fi but the pentax says it isnt, but after looking for some memory cards there are some that are eye-fi and are compatible with the pentax K30 confused
    can anyone clear this mess up?


    does that make sense ?
     
  6. thornrider

    thornrider In the Stop Bath

    The Pentax K30 would certainly make you more of an individual - like back in the days when the Spotmatic's were the envy of everyone. However, I am surprised that in 24 responses no-one has commended Nikon to you - so I will - unusual for me !!:)
     
  7. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    go on then

    bet your gonna say the D5100 lol
     
  8. Praktica Man

    Praktica Man Member

    Can you still fit old P,K,A,F lenses to digital Pentax ? if you can I might just buy a body !!!!!.
     
  9. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    If I understand you correctly, the K30 doesn't have built in wi-fi, but there is a brand of memory cards called Eye-fi which have wi-fi built in to the card, and if you use one of them, you'll be able to upload images wirelessly.

    Personally, due to security concerns, I stick to using a conventional card reader to upload my pictures to the computer.

    Yes, you can use K mount manual focus lenses on Pentax DSLRs. If you enter the focal length at switch on, you'll get Anti Shake in body stabilisation, and K-A lenses will give you metering in all exposure modes. Other MF lenses just give you centre weighted stop down metering.

    Pentax probably have the best backwards compatibility with old MF lenses of any camera make.
     
  10. Rhys

    Rhys Sasquatch

    Still surprised Jack hasn't bounced in lol
     
  11. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    AlexMonro ye mate thats what it does and if it is compatible then it will mean that i will only have to buy one memory card, ill have to read more about it first to make sure it will work because last thin i want to do is go to Rhodes with just 8GB


    wish i knew what you ment here lol

    Yes, you can use K mount manual focus lenses on Pentax DSLRs. If you enter the focal length at switch on, you'll get Anti Shake in body stabilisation, and K-A lenses will give you metering in all exposure modes. Other MF lenses just give you centre weighted stop down metering.

    does it mean i could find some cheap second hand lenses?
     
  12. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    Yes that is exacly what it meens, the world is full of old K mount lenses as it was a poular mount. Are they cheap and good, some are but I suspect some are not as cheap or good :rolleyes:
     
  13. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    cheers snorri
    if i get on with the camera ill have a look round for a K lense that is a bit bigger than the one that comes with it
     
  14. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Re: Hi all .. nps

    Hi nps,

    Firstly, congrats on the (forthcoming?) wedding :) and, secondly, regarding
    the K30 ... check out the following link threads in the Pentax Forum (Click Here)

    It is/was? on at an amazing price at SRS Microsystems Click Here

    Also, FWIW, I shoot Pentax, currently using a K-r and Pentax/Tamron lenses and
    have played with the K-30 and, sadly/happily, will be purchasing a K-30 later this year (spring/early summer) ... not because I really need it, but there are functions that make it that much better than my K-r. As well, there are features that, when shooting certain events/subjects, will make it much easier than shooting with my K-r. Initially, when it (K-30) was announced I didn't think there was anything on/in the camera that would make it a useful update from my K-r but, sadly/happily, I was wrong :eek::p.

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  15. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    hi mate thanks for the reply

    ive click your link to the amazing price, but its not cheap at all they are selling them for £500+ they are only £449 in the shops and this seller http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pentax-K-...Cameras_DigitalCameras_JN&hash=item5d37af468e sells them for less

    nice to here your good remarks on the K30, its nice to know that im not looking to buy a cram piece of equipment

    ill take a look at the pentax forum now and have a nosey round cheers
     
  16. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    Note that the ebay item you linked to includes the non weather resistant (DA L) lens option, which Wex have on their site at £399. You need the weather resistant (WR) lens to have a fully weatherproof system. CameraPriceBuster givest the current best price for the K30 with 18-55 WR lens kit as £439 from UKdigital.
     
  17. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    sorry jack i forgot to say thankyou for you congratulating me on my wedding


    cheers Alex ill go have a look at the weather proof lens one now:)
     
  18. nps

    nps Well-Known Member

    just a another question lol

    ive been looking at the link with the WR lens and notice the lens is f3.5-5.6 is that any good?? ive been reading up trying to learn a bit about cameras and somewhere it said the f number on a normal camera goes from f3 to f20 or something roughly like that
    or was it trying to say that thats what they go from to?
     
  19. Rhys

    Rhys Sasquatch

    Sounds about right for a standard zoom lens. The figure quoted indicates the widest aperture at either end of the zoom range so at 18mm it will be f3.5 wide open and at 55mm it will be f5.6 wide open. The smaller the aperture the more light it lets in but the shallower the focal point will be.

    When you say f3 to f20 that's the aperture range where f20 will be the smallest aperture letting less light in but giving the greatest focal range.

    You'll learn all this when you start taking a camera out of auto mode (or 'idiot mode' as it's called on Canons lol)
     
  20. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    I hesitate to contradict a poster with far more experience on the forums than me, but it seems that you're using some terms to have rather different meaning to what I beilieve is generally understood. In the hope of reducing future confusion to less experienced readers, perhaps I can clarify.

    I think that by "focal point" here you mean what's generally known as "depth of field", often abbreviated to DoF. I believe that "focal point" usually refers to that point on which a lens is focussed, or in picture composition, to the main point of interest in the picture.

    Most manufacturers of interchangeable lens cameras sell their lower end models with a basic "kit" lens of similar specification, which is an inexpensive get you started lens, adequate for many photographic tasks. Many people later upgrade to a better "standard" zoom (covering moderate wide angle to moderate telephoto) such as a 16-50mm f/2.8, which as well as having a larger maximum aperture to let more light in ("faster" or "brighter") and allow shallower DoF for creative effects are usually of better optical performance and more solidly constructed. The downside is cost - anything from a few hundred quid to well over a grand.

    I think that here by "focal range", you again mean what I believe is more generally known as depth of field. As I understand it, "focal range" usually refers to the range of focal lengths covered by a zoom lens, e.g. 18-55mm

    Sorry if I'm being overly pedantic, but I think that newcomers to photography probably find all the technical terms confusing enough already, and if they see them being used with different apparent meanings, they'll end up even more confused.
     

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