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Hearing aids

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Bazarchie, Nov 9, 2017.

  1. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    A friend of mine is becoming a tad deaf in one ear. Although this is often quite helpful in a household full of females, he says, it is often inconvenient. He has asked for advice as there seems a vast range available, some very expensive, some on the NHS. I doubt anybody on this forum needs hearing aids, but just in case any advice I can pass on would be appreciated.
     
  2. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Had fairly good hearing until it was decided to X-ray out everything between neck and ears.

    Got fitted with NHS aids, they work but can occasionally give a sort of ringing with certain sounds. Suppose I should go in and see a technician, but can't be bothered. Considering they were free, I can live with that. Oh, and the NHS supplies free batteries as well! The tech. tests your hearing and then connects the aids up to the computer to set the correct frequency response.

    If you leave them in, but turned off, they act as great earplugs when the boss' assorted grandchildren are around.

    S
     
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  3. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    One thing I forgot is directional sound - with the NHS type the microphones seem to be on the top, meaning that occasionally it can be difficult to work out if a sound is coming from in front or behind. I suspect that wouldn't happen with the expensive in-ear types, but it isn't really a big problem.

    S
     
  4. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    I had the first generation digital ones about 10 years ago. My hearing was damaged when I was very young and I lost the top half of the frequencies, which became worse with age. I hated the all in the ear ones and NHS are terrible, so I didn't wear them, but 2 years ago I gave in and got Specsavers' top range 2 for the price of one Siemens Receiver In Canal I think they are called. Couldn't be more pleased and they cost half of what a friend paid through a hearing consultant. I was in and out in half an hour. It is a lot of money, but you do get what you pay for and I do recommend the £2,800 jobbies, or whatever they cost now. Got NHS immediately before and dumped them quick.
    Realistically so many people have things stuffed in their ears these days, that no-one bothers about it.
    I can control them, volume, direction, etc through an app on my phone.
     
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  5. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    I have had the NHS ones for three years now. And on my last check up they fitted me with the latest type.which is an Oticon Spirit, synergy.
    They make a massive difference and balance all the frequencies you have lost over time.
    People no longer mumble.....
    They have a walk in nhs hearing clinic in Oldham, and they will service or replace parts as needed while you wait. (No cost)
    I get free packs batteries from my doctor's surgery as needed.
    If youu buy the equivalent Oticon aid privately you get the same unit but with a different name, but pay an arm and a leg for it. And will be charged for spares, repairs, services and batteries.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
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  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Oh yes I have worn aids for years. First analogue then digital which were much better. Do NHS first if you can as private are very expensive. I was working abroad when mine broke. The NHS clinic was only open Thursdays and I had alternate weekends in the UK. So I had to buy some On the plus side there was a 5 year warranty and free 6 month checks and 2 year hearing checks. It has worked out at about £10 a week for the least expensive pair (which were on 50% discount). The 5 years are up so I expect a sales pitch next week.

    But yes your friend should get his hearing properly tested. If he needs an aid (or two) then it takes a lot of getting used to.
     
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  7. Mark101

    Mark101 Well-Known Member

    My Wife has two of the latest NHS aids which were tuned for her using a computer system on final fitting. These things cost hundreds, but the NHS has a deal and gets then for around £70. Try the NHS before giving money away is my advice.Plus you get free batteries.
     
  8. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    The NHS is by far the largest purchaser of hearing aids in the world. And gets the latest technology at greatly subsidised prices.
    When I got these latest ones, they suggested I keep the old ones and use them when on holiday or the like and as spares. It seems they never reissue them.
     
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  9. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Anyone know where I can buy a decent ear trumpet?

    I'm serious. So far I've found a joke/novelty ear trumpet and a "Nazi officers' ear trumpet"...

    Swimming in the Med 60 years ago and 50 years of motorcycling have not improved my hearing.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  10. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Mine took no getting used to at all. Though I did find that I turn them down one notch.
     
  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I remember I signed a paper to reimburse NHS £75 if I lost them - that would be about 10 years ago, but I suspect the cost to NHS is substantially more, high hundreds at least. There is a lot of tech in aids.
     
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Really? The works canteen was just awful for me - sound of cutlery on plates and the clatter of washing up! First day I wore them (analogue ones) I near jumped out of my skin at the sound of a newspaper page turning over. All the noises you learn to ignore come rushing at you!
     
  13. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Not sure three years in the artillery helped mine a great deal. No ear defenders in those days.
    The problem with ear trumpets is that they only increase the sound, not selectively adjust for missing frequencies.
    So you just get louder mumbles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
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  14. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Never tried the old analoge ones. Though I could hear the loo cistern hissing for the first time with these high end digital ones. And triangles for the first time in years.
     
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  15. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    No it seems not, though they can charge £75 each now. Though a friend who lost one in hospital was not charged.
     
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  16. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Terry,

    A wonderful caption to an 18th century engraving of artillery, which belonged to a friend of my parents in Bermuda in maybe '67. He was on R&R from Vietnam, cut short because "I guess they're just running short of artillery captains":

    Artillery lends dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl.

    Yes, I know about frequencies. A friend was responsible for some of the basic patents (among over 100 others). He was the only man I ever knew who listed his occupation as "Inventor". He worked for Kodak. As an inventor...


    Cheers,

    R.
     
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  17. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Thanks everybody, seems a visit to the doctor is the next step (for my friend). I love music and want to hear it the best I can. Some restaurants/ bars/etc have such bad acoustics, I give up trying to listen to conversations.
     
  18. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    I find the things don't actually help in places with a lot of background noise. But then I don't like places with a lot of background noise anyway.

    I would give the hospital hearing dept. a bell first, see if they will just take you.

    S
     
  19. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    I'm sure you really didn't mean to trigger my Pavlovian instinct for a wisecrack...but..
    Tinnitus anyone?
     
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  20. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    If you have special listening needs the NHS ones can have adjustable programs set up by the audiologist. They have far better equipment for this than private high street set ups. Musicians for instance have very special needs. If you dont ask they may not even set up the volume control.
    They can even pick up bluetook radio streams if set up for it.
    .
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017

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