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Haven't had a cricket photo in ages...

Discussion in 'Appraisal Gallery' started by gray1720, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    ...so here's one!

    Suggestions welcome - I usually add some compensastion to get my whites properly exposed (on a really bright day, up to -1.7 stops), but that does tend to lead to rather dark backgrounds. I guess a bit of selective levels? Have to bone up on how to do that!

    Adrian
    _DSC0542.jpg
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  2. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    Never got the concept of cricket... (Can’t say I have put much effort in it). But how can a game last days the on one team wins 500 to 1!? What were they other sods doing?


    Great timing in this shot.
     
  3. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Love the action, but pity you have movement in the head as well as faster moving parts. 250th just not nearly enough for 400/600mm. Really needed to go up with the ISO, but appreciate you are using a vintage DSLR.

    You can create a mask, but it takes a lot of work, but you do seem to have a big dynamic range for the rather aged sensor to cope with here.
     
  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Very difficult if your metering is dominated by the dark background and the light runs in strips across the pitch so that the player is moving sun-shadow-sun. This exposure looks fairly good to me. Shame his face is not quite so clear, could be that the focus is on his middle and he is leant a fair way backward rather than head movement. If your camera supports spot metering coupled to the active focus point it could be worth trying that with +exposure compensation but that carries more risk than your current approach, everything will "blow" if you miss. Otherwise set a manual exposure based on a spot measurement. That's what I do if a moving subject goes against a varying brightness background. Given the nature of the subject I think you probably have to live with dark backgrounds. Set the contrast way down and recover in processing maybe.
     
  5. PeteE

    PeteE Well-Known Member

    That would go into the Sports Page of a local newspaper -- they don't worry about 'dark backgrounds' == it's the Cricketer and the Action they look at !
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  6. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Sorry Adrian, while the timing and form of the batsman are absolutely spot on the loss of sharpness and definition in the head and upper body spoils it for me. Background doesn't look particularly dark though - I've had much worse...
     
  7. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Oooo err


    Try first thing in the morning, it's usually a given:)
     
  8. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    NIGEL! Behave!

    It is, unfortunately, a game that lends itself towards really challenging light conditions. I suspect the loss of sharpness may be me getting the wobbles in the heat as I shoot with a shoulder stock, but will certainly look at using higher ISO. I think I can go to a monstrous 1600 though doubtless I'll get noise like a jumbo jet. Should really watch my speeds, but the viewfinder on the D200 is frankly pants, if I look for the focus confirm light I can see nothing else.

    I'll also look up whether I can use spot metering with the focus point - more chance of getting a game on Sunday to practice at now that England have lost the footie!

    Adrian
     
  9. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    It was the D200 that made me go to Oly. The D100 was by then an old model, so I wanted to go digital with the replacement, but they took so long to bring it out and I had a trip upcoming, so I bought a cheap Oly outfit pro tem and never got round to changing back.
     
  10. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Sorry, but really couldn't resist.:cool:
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    That's not a cricket: it's a man in funny clothes.

    Apart from that, for me the blur/ movement is perfect. For God's sake, who wants camera club sharpness in a shot like that? Only a camera club judge.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Nigel,

    You're young yet...

    Who was it who said, "Never waste an erection or trust a fart -- or was it the other way around?"

    Glad this forum is mostly populated by grown-ups, and that the moderators recognize this.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  13. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Badump tish! He's here all week, folks!

    You don't know what you've missed not getting a D200, Mike. You're never short a doorstop, bookend*, wheel chock, boat anchor...

    Adrian

    *When it finally snuffs it, it may well replace the Zenit in holding up my photography books.
     
  14. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    If the sky is clear the light should be consistent for long enough to use manual exposure. Just expose to the right as much as possible.

    Linking a spot meter to a focus point might be handy in tricky conditions when it would be impractical to keep changing exposure settings although I don't think I've ever used the feature in anger.

    Auto exposure is good for when you want different exposures between shots. It is not good for consistency but at least cricketers are all in whites and you don't have people in Gorilla suits running past to deal with too.
     

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