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Hands free phone ban when driving...

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Malcolm_Stewart, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I think existing legislation may be of use, it is illegal to have a TV where a driver can see it, surely an advertising sign that changes image can be described at a TV screen? I would like such advertisements banned for the very reason you state, they draw attention away from the road..
     
    daft_biker likes this.
  2. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    If you can't keep your mind on your driving when passing an advertisment you surely aren't safe on any urban road.
     
  3. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Static advertisements are one thing, a flickering sign board is quite another. Have you not see them, there is one South of the M4 just to the West of the M25 and another to the North of the M4 on the East side of the M25. Under some conditions they become very noticeable and distraction, other time I don't even notice them. Actually, it is so long since I have noticed them that I am now wondering if they are still there.
     
  4. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Way out of my comfort zone these days so not something I'm likely to come across.

    On the other hand driving in a street with shops or even more a school there's going to be all sorts of distractions. Some of those distractions (small children "off the leash" for instance) you actually need to pay some attention to in any case. Of course you should be going a great deal slower than on a motorway and you are in any case expecting the distractions in an urban setting but there are plenty of equally distracting things to be aware of on a motorway too.

    Having said which: what pratt thinks it's a good idea to put any advert on a motorway or other high speed road? :rolleyes:
     
  5. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Probably the one who owns the land and gets a nice income from the advertisers.

    I think we have a different interpretation of "distraction" in this context. Children around a school are hazards and concentrate the mind on driving safely, a ringing telephone or a flashing advert is a distraction and draws one's attention away from the road. The more subtle "distractions" are navigation system voice prompts, traffic announcements (especially when you haven't turned the volume back down after changing the battery) and sudden loud music. They are all things you have chosen to have and should be helpful but timing is everything and they are unaware of the situation. I always turn off navigation audio, I can chose when to look at a display but I can't chose when the system delivers a prompt.
     
  6. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Quite possibly. About 40 years ago I went on a safe driving course run by Devon and Cornwall Police and very interesting it was too. One session was about concentration and distraction. The officer giving the course explained that many accidents came about when people were driving conscientiously but became fixed on something that was a possible hazard (say: a child playing on the pavement) and missed a more immediate danger such as a car emerging from the opposite side of the road. He told us that advanced drivers were taught to keep their eyes moving around the field of view to avoid that sort of problem.
     
  7. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    With sat-nav I keep the voice on so I'm not looking at the display.
     
  8. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I get “next turn” on the HUD so no need to look down.

    I have a cousin in Suffolk, going there I use the M25, coming back the A14 can be quicker, on one occasion I had my Garmin programmed on the way back but for some reason the sound wasn’t muted. When I didn’t turn left to use the A12 it insisted, at every junction, that I should turn around. Extremely distracting! However turning off route guidance would have been even worse, I did manage to mute the sound though.

    SatNav is an aid, I try to ensure that I always have a good idea of where I need to go before settling out, the Sat Nav is really only for the last mile or so but the time and distance to go is useful, as is the traffic information.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  9. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    I don't have HUD. My new Civic has a next turn on the dash, but still like to hear the turn info, as the dash display doesn't give the road name.
     
  10. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    I find it interesting to track roughly how long it takes for the sat nav to agree with me in such situations. A couple of months back the sat nav in a BMW hire car was trying to make me go via the A120 & M11 despite the fact traffic reports indicated a problem (and it's ETA was steadily climbing for this route) 10 minutes after heading for the A14 it switched route to the one I'd picked as an alternative & the ETA came out 1 minute quicker than it's route originally showed (by that point a good hour quicker than it's preferred route).
     
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I had something similar going to a wedding outside Bournemouth, SatNav wanted me to go via Andover and Salisbury but eventually agreed with my M3/A27 and the ETA reverted to what I expected.

    Navigation systems have their limitations and I really can't understand why people become so dependent upon them.
     
  12. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    I find google maps to be pretty good at finding destinations, usually better than the car's sat-nav, and better at traffic data.
     
  13. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Today in Devon we went down some roads which I actually thought were private drives..:eek:
     
    Catriona likes this.
  14. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    And you saw nothing but the hedges! I remember it well.
     
    spinno likes this.
  15. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Mrs S said that tourist attractions should mention the fact that they are located down single track narrow lanes... If they did that no-one would ever visit them.
     
    Catriona likes this.
  16. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    We used to live along one of those. Great fun watching the grockles trying conclusions with a tractor hauling a silage trailer: "Back up there you peasant". On a couple of occassions we had to pull the idiots out of the ditch. ;)
     
  17. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    That sums up most of the designated 'scenic routes' we tried in Cornwall. Strangely hedges were less of an issue on other roads (even tiny ones)
     
    Catriona likes this.
  18. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    That doesn't sound good.
    I pick my mini (fatty:p more like it) up in another week.
    It has a BMW sat-nav, so I guess that is as bad as all the rest then?
     
  19. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    The problem with all Sat Nav systems is that they require a very simple, non-distracting, interface, they are also built to a tight specification in terms of physical size and price. That makes programming alternative routings difficult and. if the memory is small, possibly impossible. Ideally you would create a route and incorporate several alternatives such that if there were heavy traffic on the primary route you would be directed by a preferred and appropriate alternative.

    That isn't how most navigation systems work, they try to dynamically reroute around traffic, which is fine much of the time but a programmed alternative allows you to apply knowledge of narrow roads and the like. The UK is one of the most comprehensively mapped countries in the world but I don't know of a navigation system that uses that wealth of information to allow users to avoid narrow roads. I often think that a "suspend guidance" button would be useful to prevent the system from trying to return to its preferred route. I would also appreciate the ability to specify a radius around familiar places, such as home, where navigation guidance would cease, I know my local area and where the traffic issues exist I don't really need guidance but the ETA would be useful.
     
  20. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    I would advise anyone who acquires a SatNav, before you use it for real, use it first on routes and destinations you already know. Get to know how it works (or doesn't...)
     

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