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Getting no where with my image colours

Discussion in 'Beginner's Corner' started by Nikoboy, Jan 18, 2019.

  1. Nikoboy

    Nikoboy Active Member

    Having had my Nikon for several years and although I don't spend hours and hours taking images, but am very often jealous of the quality of some of those I've added below.

    I have tried using my camera in Auto, Shutter priority, Aperture priority, various ISO speeds and filters.

    Are these images Photoshop adjusted, my camera out of date or simply still using the wrong settings/filters

    Image A.jpg Image B.jpg Image C.jpg Image D.jpg
     
  2. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    What is it that you perceive in these images, that you're not seeing in yours?
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I' don't really know what you mean.

    Your question reads as if these 4 images are by other people and you like the colours in these but that you don't see colours in your pictures (not shown) that you like.

    In the case that it is other people pics and whether they edited or not. My guesses are:

    Top left is possibly HDR effect, it doesn't look real. Top right looks a bit odd. I have seen cyan sky but the transition from dark blue to cyan here is rather strong for the sun behind.

    The bottom left looks like an ND graduate has been used. It's nice.

    The bottom right looks like there was a strong shadow (off a cliff or something) in the foreground which has been compensated for and maybe a grad filter used on the sky. The end result is all rather murky.
     
    Roger Hicks and peterba like this.
  4. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    I've got to say that - to my eye - they all look a little 'samey'.
     
  5. Nikoboy

    Nikoboy Active Member

    Here is an example taken in Auto with my camera.
    To me its lacks colour definition etc (Bland).
    I dont have HDR on the D40X Image E.jpg
     
  6. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Well, IMO, yours looks better. I don't like garishly super-saturated post-processing.

    I'd stick with your D40x. :)
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The colour looks credible. It's winter and flat light. You can try setting -1/3 exposure compensation. That tends to increase saturation but you will need to swap out of Auto. The camera should also have a landscape profile that deepens blues and greens. I don't know what is called on Nikon - I think it might be "vivid".
     
  8. Nikoboy

    Nikoboy Active Member

    Thanks guys,
    I do have a Landscape setting away from Auto, I'll give it a go and compare.;)
     
  9. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    The settings you chose have resulted in a largely blown out sky so you had some room to underexpose and get a bit more colour into the sky. Depending on how much that needed, you may have found that it would enrich the colours in the foreground, or that it really darkened them and you would need to selectively lighten those areas in yoru choice of editing software. But you will probably always struggle to get incredibly vivid colour in that kind of flat light.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  10. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Yes, the key to this is dependent on the original lighting conditions. The other people's pictures that were posted were taken in conditions that were brighter and more contrasty than the picture that Nikoboy took himself. Now I have Fujifilm CSCs that have a Velvia setting, Velvia film produces this kind of colour and saturation, but only in the right lighting conditions, the cameras can only produce this kind of output in those conditions. I have to say that I was getting pretty sick of seeing shots taken on Velvia with a polariser, such colour saturation being largely unrealistic.
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    They may seem that way, but often, that's because historical print processes often led to flat, dull pictures lacking in contrast. If you can directly compare even a highly saturated slide with the original subject, the subject is very often more vivid. With prints it's even more so. Commonly, it's seeing the photograph in flat, dull surroundings that makes it seem unrealistic.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I agree that the Fuji digital rendition of Velvia (especially the Lightroom implementation) and use of a polariser don't go well together. Generally I prefer the Astia colour rendition with a slight increase in saturation or vibrance. I do use the Velvia rendition for some landscapes but not with a polariser.
     
  13. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Pete,

    The point is, of course, that it's all interpretation and replication. The colours in a photograph are not the colours of real life: they are simply reconstructions, using coloured dyes and pigments. There is no such thing as true colour: there is only pleasing (or perhaps convincing) colour.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  14. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Absolutely Roger, and of course each person has their own colour vision and their own colour memory. My colour memory is terrible and I do often get into a mess when I perceive the colour on the screen isn't "right" but in what way I can't say.

    In the original query it cannot be ruled out that the four examples given appear differently to the poster and to each of those that replied. This would make the search for an answer somewhat difficult.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  15. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    With regard to the OP picture, He says it lacks colour definition, but my opinion it needs a little reduction in brightness and it would be ok. What settings did the camera use?
     
  16. Nikoboy

    Nikoboy Active Member

    Cannot find the settings the camera used for my image above.
    But the image below, again this was in Auto.
    Metering - Matrix
    Shutter - 1/60
    Exposure mode - Auto
    Exp -/+ - 0.0
    Focal length - 30mm
    Flash mode - Built in

    Image F.jpg
     
  17. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Do you know the aperture value (f number)
     
  18. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure what it is you want from showing this picture of the wood. Colour looks OK to me, bearing in mind that taking pictures under trees is pretty hard for the camera white balance. It is a bit soft, perhaps a touch of camera shake.


    What David was saying in post #15 was the same as me in #7 - decreasing exposure by a small amount (e.g. 1/3 of a stop) increases saturation. The image becomes less bright.
     
  19. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    There isn't imho much wrong with the colours in this image. It could do with some processing, which would undoubtedly lift things, it is not really the kind of image, or the conditions, where a highly saturated contrasty image can be obtained.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  20. Nikoboy

    Nikoboy Active Member

    Also not mentioned, I have a UV filter on all my Lenes to help with protection and use a Polarise filter sometimes to try bring out the blue skies etc., if this correct.
    I've read Aperture mode would have better results, if this is so.
    Should I experiment more using this Aperture mode.
     

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