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freeware monitor calibration software?

Discussion in 'Help Team' started by nailbrush, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. nailbrush

    nailbrush Well-Known Member

    Defiantly feels like I need to calibrate my monitor. Any one have any freeware software recommendations. :)
     
  2. Norman

    Norman Well-Known Member

    If you're going to do it then I would suggest that you use a hardware device to measure the screen. The problem with using Eyeball mark 1 is that you have no reference and that different lighting conditions in your room will affect your 'reading'. get yourself a colorimeter and you can be sure that your monitor is displaying correct colour and gamma.

    Photoshop used to ship with a software solution but they gave it up some years back when they realised it wasn't giving the results required. These people offer a number of hardware solutions from about £60 + VAT. There may be cheaper places but I can recommend this company.
     
  3. Eye Robot

    Eye Robot Well-Known Member

    Have you tried the one that comes with Windoze 7 Control Panel - It may be a bit basic but it's free and you probably have it already.
     
  4. nailbrush

    nailbrush Well-Known Member

    No funds for the hardware hence asking about freeware. I was under the understanding that it can be done by eye.
     
  5. nailbrush

    nailbrush Well-Known Member

    XP :rolleyes:
     
  6. Norman

    Norman Well-Known Member

    Take a look here for some good info.
     
  7. nailbrush

    nailbrush Well-Known Member


    Excellent, thank you very much.

    On my monitor do I set the colour to sRGB?
     
  8. Norman

    Norman Well-Known Member

    I take it you have downloaded QuickGamma from the link on that site. I would suggest following the instructions on the program. I use a SpyderElite hardware device and that produces a profile for your specific monitor. It is that profile that gets applied to your monitor when you start Windows. I assume the software only solutions produce something similar but I have no experience of them since I ditched Adobe Gamma. That did used to produce a profile that got loaded at startup.
     
  9. Meredith

    Meredith Well-Known Member

    The problem is you can't do it properly by eye, you need a bit of hardware to measure the monitor. Unfortunately that means spending money. You might be able to get very good results by eye but you can not be sure if you have or not.
     
  10. PhilW

    PhilW Well-Known Member

    I agree, but given the op doesn’t want to spend any i was wondering if one could make the mk1 eyeball more effective by doing your calibration in daylight with all artificial lifts turned off. That might get closer to a balanced result?
     
  11. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    If you can afford a monitor capable and worth the effort of callibration then why resent the cost of suitable hardware and software to do so?
     
  12. PhilW

    PhilW Well-Known Member

    In these economic times there could be any number of reasons.
     
  13. Mosstrooper

    Mosstrooper Well-Known Member

    I have never calibrated a Monitor in my life, I thought they all came already calibrated. or do the makers not bother with that kind of thing?
     
  14. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    I think you are slightly missing the point here. Calibration enables the monitor to display accurately the result to be expected in a print, out of the box this is simply not possible to fine accuracy.
     
  15. Mosstrooper

    Mosstrooper Well-Known Member

    It is possible I am missing the point, since I have never been a perfectionist all this fanatical stuff is just lost on me and 95% of the population.
     
  16. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    DNFTT.
     
  17. Roy5051

    Roy5051 Well-Known Member

    DNFTT - I had to google this - are you suggesting that people who don't calibrate their monitors are trolls? I must admit that, having calibrated monitors in the past, both CRT and TFT, including calibrating a printer, I can see little point in the exercise. Perhaps if you have an expensive monitor and printer, and always use certain inks and paper, and have perfect eyesight (colourwise) you may see the benefit. But for most people, the benefits are not immediately apparent. Certainly not if you buy different papers/inks and don't stick to the printer manufacturers' recommendations. I guess that makes me a troll!
     
  18. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Not at all, Roy, but I am suggesting that people who make nothing but provocative postings fall into that category.

    As to calibration, well my experience couldn't actually be more different, and I'm at a loss as to how you've determined that "most people" wouldn't find the benefits - can you point me to the findings that support that, please? In all honesty, I think the cheaper the monitor, the more it benefits from regular calibration, and from various comments on images shown for appraisal on here I'm pretty confident almost everyone would actually see the benefits of calibration - I was absolutely shocked with the difference the first time I did it.
     
  19. Roy5051

    Roy5051 Well-Known Member

    I must admit to now being totally confused as to the benefits of calibration. The way I understand it, calibration of your monitor and printer enables you to match the screen output to the printer output. How then does one know whether a monitor has been calibrated simply by looking at images posted on a website?

    My experience of "most people" are comments made to me by photographers and camera club members (excluding the "really serious" of course). Our camera club has two calibration kits, one just for the monitor and the other for the monitor and printer. I have used them both in the past, but being a "poor pensioner" I am unable to afford to use Epson inks and paper, so I use third party products. As such, I would need to calibrate my monitor and printer every time I changed inks/paper, and this would not be feasible in the circumstances.

    I therefore use generic settings on my monitor (sRGB), use colour profile sRGB in Elements on my images, and set my printer to Colour Management Same as Source; I then use the Epson Vivid Colour Control in the printer Properties, which I may tweak should images look to be oversaturated in a particular colour.

    I must point out, though, that my prints are for my personal use; I do not enter competitions. When I want a bigger print than possible on my A4 printer, I use ProAm.
     
  20. Mosstrooper

    Mosstrooper Well-Known Member

    Thank you Roy, its just another Forumite who can't stand to read any view different from his own, I completely forgot I'm not allowed to make a comment here without being abused by him.
     

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