1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Flipper

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by Roger Hicks, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Today I did something I very rarely do: "flipped" or "flopped" an image left for right. As I explain in the text, I just thought it looked better that way. It's not a great picture, but I like it better flopped. How often (if ever) do you flop pictures? What do you think of the ethics and emotional effect?

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  2. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    I agree, they have completely different moods and I much prefer the one rising from left to right. I have hardly ever myself used this technique (but I might now) and of course a lot of American history is documented in tintype images that are similarly flipped.

    Edit: Personally I have no problem with the ethics but not, as you say, in a botany textbook
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
  3. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    With abstracts I have no qualms about flipping or even standing the picture on it's head if I think that it looks better or more interesting or intriguing. In any case, who's going to know? I took the photo and I'm the only one who knows what 'right way round' is, and not always then.

    Lynn
     
  4. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    So do I, considerably so, and I wonder how many others agree with this. It would be interesting to see if people from other cultures, who do not use a left-to-right, top-to-bottom writing method agree.

    Note to self - must apply for a huge research grant to travel the world and find out. :D
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  5. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    I regularly flip/flop images to see what effect it has, but rarely leave them flipped. I was intriqued, when I first used one, at how a large format camera flipped the image around and I felt there was a thought process that went into the composition that was missing when you could see it the right way round. You learn to read the image slightly differently. Since then I have almost always given images a quick flip to see if it makes me notice anything differently which might affect how I choose to compose the next one, or go about presenting it differently. It's not often that they stay flipped though because I don't deal in subjects that really allow it - mostly.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  6. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    It is probably just me but I have a mental picture of a small child sliding down the "correct" version and getting impaled on the upward facing spikes of the buds and that upsets me:eek:
     
    Geren likes this.
  7. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Reminds me of the time when, as an 18 year old student, and a bit tipsy, I decided to slide down the bannister of the stairwell in the block of flats I was living in. This was something I did regualrly at home, the bannister being of old oak with a large roundel type thing at the bottom to break your slide. Unfortunately, the flat's bannister had 'decorative' lumps of ironwork at regular intervals. I couldn't sit down for a week.
     
  8. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker New Member

    I to prefer the post-flipped image. Nothing wrong with flipping. I do it all the time for albums I design. If the layout benefits from the photo being flopped, that's what I do.
     
  9. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    The bannister of the main staircase in the main building of my old school had big nasty lumps on too. In this case it was to prevent pupils trying to slide down it.

    They were put in after one pupil fell twenty feet onto the marble floor and died.
     
  10. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    I find a rising image more attractive. I wonder if another person who also likes a rising image, but reads their natural language right to left would prefer the unflipped image.
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Or would they still be taken in by the usual Cartesian coordinates, with zero at bottom left? Which is the stronger convention? Is that convention geographically limited? Perhaps the real question is, how would an illiterate like it?

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    Graphs generally have zero bottom left. However, Der Spiegel includes every month a graph/chart of the popularity of various politicians in Germany, and which rises from right to left.

    Lynn
     

Share This Page