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Expose to the right

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by Bazarchie, May 5, 2017.

  1. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Related to a recent thread, does anybody use this technique on a regular basis in order to reduce noise? On my newest camera 7Dii I rarely use exposure compensation, on my 5Di I under expose by 3/4 stop permanently.
     
  2. Ffolrord

    Ffolrord Well-Known Member

    I err on the side of caution and aim not to blow highlights rather than worry about noise - but then I don't have a Canon.
     
  3. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    No, I don't use expose-to-the-right as a principle. I run my 5D mk1 on at least one stop under (and on a low ISO), and then 'push' in post. This usually manages to avoid blown highlights

    TBH, I'm fairly amazed that you manage to get away with 'only' 3/4 stop on your 5D mk1 without blown highlights. :)
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  4. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    If you usually under exposure by at least one stop on your 5Dc, what is your average?

    Do you also have a more modern camera?
     
  5. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    'Average' is probably 1.33 stops, but it varies a great deal, according to conditions (and intended results :)).

    I do have a more modern camera, too.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  6. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    And how to you rate your more modern camera in terms of iq at ISO 100/200?

    I am am thinking of buying a 6D but need to be convinced
     
  7. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Good question - but I don't have a modern full-frame camera, so comparisons are not entirely relevant. I have contemplated a 6D, but there's something about the output of the 5Dc that I like. Luminance noise doesn't really bother me (I have almost a minor aversion to technically "perfect" images). Also, chroma noise bothers me only rarely - since probably 80% of my images are in B&W.

    I seem to have helped very little in your attempt to be convinced of your need for a 6D... ;)
     
  8. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    But you have helped me to decide that I should keep my 5Di. For whatever reason the 5D produces pictures that appeal to me.
     
    peterba likes this.
  9. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    In that case... glad to have been of service! :)
     
  10. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    To expose to the right reliably you need to spot meter the highlights. That is quite some effort and easy to mess up. Many subjects with average reflectivity look "better" slightly under exposed and I used to have my 5D on -1/3. Not quite sure how you manage -3/4 (as compared with -1/2 or -2/3) unless doing it in post.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  11. IvorCamera

    IvorCamera Well-Known Member

    I over expose by one third of a stop this gives a better result on my calibrated monitors, but sometimes when the subject is a bit tricky (very bright sky or other) the settings have to be set to whats required.....
     
  12. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    It's more or less my standard technique for static shots, except that rather than spot metering I chimp and use the histogram. I then often play around with the tone curve in processing until I get the look that I want. I suppose it's sort of a bit like an updated form of the zone system.
     
  13. Gezza

    Gezza Well-Known Member

    The reason for going to the right provided you don't blow anything is to get as much info as possible in the shadows.
     
  14. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    Quite so. I use an ancient Sekonic L-438 (the one with the dial on the back) to meter the highest highlight in the scene and use the zone system. I place the highlight on zone 7, unless it's snow in bright sunlight or similar, in which case it goes into zone 8. The rear dial makes it trivial to set the correct exposure by setting the EV reading against the desired zone.

    Works for me! :cool:
     
  15. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    I just expose sensibily and check the histogram when and if I can remember to do so.
     

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