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E-bikes

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by steveandthedogs, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Thinking of getting one, possibly Ebco UCR 30.

    Anyone tried one, or any other? Any comments, if you have?

    S
     
  2. frank1

    frank1 Well-Known Member

    Go for it they are brilliant. I've got a Volt Pulse X £2000. When I was going through the process of research into buying an Ebike. I started at the lower end of the market but on a few YouTube vids I chose the Pulse X. Getting on a bike now is a breeze and probably a safer way to cycle on London roads at least. The acceleration is a real boon at busy junctions or passing buses. Pity it's restricted to a maximum of 15 mph, 25 would be great.

    I went out the other day on what I call a Cash Converter shuffle. I know I won't try to explain but with my sense of direction and taking a wrong turn. The journey turned out to be a 30 mile one instead of what should have been a 20 mile one. At 58 years of age an Ebike was exactly the right bike for the job. Going up hills and passing people younger than me is a joy but they catch you on the straight.

    An Ebike takes the strain out of cycling that's not to say you don't have to work. My bike is battery assisted which means the motor only runs whilst I cycle. One thing If the battery runs out when you're on the road then you'll be in trouble. These bikes are very heavy and as such are not easy to use without assistance so choose one with plenty of power and runs for a good length of time.

    I'd personally recommend the Pulse X but it may beyond your price range. A lot of retailers offer interest free payment schemes which may help. I do think these bikes are a way forward on getting more people on the roads as cyclists. Most retailers will offer try before you buy options. I have no doubt these bikes are the way to go so go on get one but do some research.
     
  3. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I've got a Powabyke X6 and a Gocycle. I've previously used not 1 but 2 Chinese bikes. In my experience the most important point is how easily you can remove the wheels to repair punctures. The Chinese bikes were nightmares and you really wouldn't want a flat rear tyre on a wet night. The Gocycle is superb - undo 3 clips and you're ready to repair either front or rear tyre. The Powabyke is more or less the same as any other chain driven touring bike. The rear wheel needs to be positioned just right to get it back in the forks with the chain and gear cable. The front is the same as a normal bike with the addition of disconnecting and reconnecting the power linkage. Riding wise the Powabyke is a standard touring bike with power when you want it. The Gocycle is more an electric bike that you can pedal when you want to. All that said I've barely used either of them over the last 2 years so I'm wondering if their time has passed.
     
  4. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    That was quick, chaps!

    Frank - I think the Volt is a bit too much expensive. Also the nearest dealer is over 70 miles away. I really want a shop within quick travelling distance. Nice looking machine, though, with a high-torque motor, which I probably need around here.

    Andrew - good point about wheel changing. Must remember to ask the shop about that.

    Anglesey may be low-lying, but it certainly isn't flat; the hills are either very long and fairly gentle, or shortish and evil. Although is a couple of instances, they are long and evil. Bit too much for my knees and general fitness level these days.

    S
     
  5. frank1

    frank1 Well-Known Member

    All I can say is Ebikes put the fun back into cycling. My last job was based at Gunnersbury Park 10 miles from me in Islington. I'm a carpenter so the work is physical. When I started I thought I can cycle that using my then standard bike. Two days and going home I was in horrible pain my body was trying to tell me something. So I put the bike away and took to the tube ( not a fan ). Sometime later along came a Pulse X and 20 miles a day became easier. I've done 1600 miles now in less than 6 months. May not sound much I don't know but I could not have done it on a standard bike.
     
  6. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I have been considering one for years. I had a go on a friends once. The acceleration from start off was outstanding. His cost over 4 grand though and looked like a normal bike, in that the battery was almost part of the frame so at a glance it wasn't that obvious it was an E bike.
     
  7. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Sounds enough to me!

    S
     
  8. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I think my friend got his from here. They seem to have a fair selection.
     
  9. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    15mph is the reason many of the ones I've seen out on the trails were imported from Germany as bolt on kits for normal bikes.
     
  10. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    I hope that ebikes are not allowed to use shared pedestrian/cycling footways.
     
  11. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Why?

    Restricted to 15mph.

    S
     
  12. frank1

    frank1 Well-Known Member


    Road bikes are restricted to 15mph and can only use a 250 watt motor in this country. Off road bikes are not as restricted as far as I know. It's ridiculous really when any youthful cyclist on a decent light standard bike will go a lot faster. Usually the people using the Regent's Park outer road as a training area had no problem passing me on my way to work. The fastest I've got to on my bike was 26mph going down Holland Park Avenue. There's a guy on YouTube going down hill and he reaches 50mph.
     
    steveandthedogs likes this.
  13. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Forgotten about the off-road.

    Which makes an interesting question - is a public footpath in a town counted as part of a road, or is it off-road? i.e. is the sort of path Learning is on about designated as a 15mph area?

    S
     
  14. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    Strictly speaking I'm not sure the "off-road" ones are legal other than on private land the public doesn't have access to.

    In the woods I believe the national speed limit applies and the roads are usually single carriageways so you can do 60mph. (e.g. turn into Glentress off a road which is now a 50mph and there is a national speed limit sign before the forestry commission signs saying 15mph which if you exceed might mean you get asked not to come back.)
     
  15. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Am I right in thinking that yes the motor is restricted to 15MPH, but you can still go considerably faster when you pedal so all the motor is doing is assisting. You are therefore able to go as fast as your legs will take you as on any pushbike? That of course is a damn sight faster than 15MPH.
     
    daft_biker likes this.
  16. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member


    Cyclists need not apply...
    and for the avoidance of doubt...
     
  17. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Around here, we have a few combined foot- and cycle paths... Is the council breaking the law? Mind you, Ynys Mon has a well-deserved reputation for being less than totally honest.

    What I want to know is why Learning is against them using shared footways. They are no more dangerous than ordinary cycles from what I can see.

    S
     
  18. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    I think that's right, but the top speed achievable seems to be a bit less that than of ordinary machines. Probably because most users are either geriatrics or commuters rather than lycra types.

    S
     
  19. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    Pedestrians can use carriageways unless it's a motorway. People can wander as aimlessly as they like most places.:)
     
    steveandthedogs likes this.
  20. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I think if i remember right from my friends, who used to commute to work a long way, you could set the amount of electrically assistance you want. He used his as a means to keep fit too (he was a cyclist anyway) but he had a lot of hills to climb as he lived in the hills of Lancashire. That is when it came into it's own as he could pedal with assistance up long hills. I believe it almost halved his journey time to work. His was an expensive one and was remarkably still quite light.
     

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