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double exposure with the nikon d3100

Discussion in 'Help Team' started by dslrdude, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. dslrdude

    dslrdude Active Member

    can anyone give me advice on how to achieve this please ?
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I thought this was one thing that could not be done with digital cameras. Check the manual. If it doesn't mention it then you cannot except maybe the old way of having the camera on bulb and blanking off the lens manually and opening it again.
     
  3. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    There are certainly digital cameras that can do this - the Fuji S3 Pro and Pentax K20D to name 2!

    If you can't find it in the manual under "Double Exposure" try "Multiple Exposure". If there's no sign in the manual that the D3100 can do this, you could always do it in your image editor program. Just take 2 normal pictures, import them as separate layers, and merge the layers. You have a lot more flexibility to use things like masks or varying the opacity than you would just doing it in camera.
     
  4. NosamLuap

    NosamLuap Rebmem Roines

    I'm pretty sure the d3100 doesn't support multiple exposures... I searched the online manual for "double" and "multiple" and found no reference.

    you can do this pretty easily on your PC, just use layers and adjust the opacity and you should get something close fairly easily.
     
  5. NosamLuap

    NosamLuap Rebmem Roines

    It certainly can be done - my Nikon d300s certainly supports it, and models higher in the range also do as i understand it.

    I've never used it personally - it's one thing that is easier and more controllable to do on the PC after shooting two frames.
     
  6. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    Not on a Digital SLR.
    There is no need, as it can all be done in post processing.
    Some digital compacts have this facility, but that is just for people to upload to the net straight away. If you use photoshop or anything similar with layers, you can be d them together.
     
  7. NosamLuap

    NosamLuap Rebmem Roines

    You seem to be implying that dslr cameras don't have this feature?Apologies if that's not what you intended to say, but i can confirm that some certainly do. This article describes the feature as it's implemented on my camera
    http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D300S/D300SA5.HTM (almost at the bottom of the page, under "multiple exposure".)


    I do agree that it can be done easily in post processing, but it's certainly not a feature limited to compact digital cameras.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2013
  8. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    It can be done on the D7000 too. Another feature I'll try once and never look at again.
     
  9. dslrdude

    dslrdude Active Member

    so basically it will be easier to use my software to achieve this effect.
     
  10. thornrider

    thornrider In the Stop Bath

    You can use "image overlay" in the Retouch menu.
     
    Missd80 likes this.
  11. NosamLuap

    NosamLuap Rebmem Roines

    Yes, in my experience it is for a coupe of reasons:

    1 - if you take the double exposure in camera, and you miss the moment with the second frame, you have to shoot both again
    2 - if you decide, on seeing the result, that you don't like it, you have nothing. Shooting individual frames at least means you have the non manipulated images to use
    3 - you have far more control over the blending when done in post processing
     
  12. PhilW

    PhilW Well-Known Member

    Multiple exposure (up to 5 i think) are supported by all Pentax dSLRs as well.

    With an option for the camera to automatically calculate the joint exposure. All very clever :D

    Yes you can do it on the PC, but I think there is a certain 'fun' to be had doing this in camera.

    As an aside with flash photography (studio or strobist) this can also me achieved with a single longish exposure with two or more flash "pops". That's good fun to experiment with as well.
     

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