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Doing InFraRed the cheating and really cheating way ....

Discussion in 'Colour or Not' started by Done_rundleCams, May 9, 2018.

  1. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    I guess it must be why I shoot so many IR shots, pure chance means I get one or two that work.
     
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  2. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Sounds like me with any kind of shooting, P_C, and still not sure if I have the cojones to try real IR film. As well, I found
    another IR filter from the same manufacturer except this one is called the IR 760 filter. An extra 20 (??'s) on the filter.

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  3. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Go for it .

    Or start with R80s or R400s, they are a bit cheaper than straight IR films but still good.

    Anyway, the shots you show on here are worth the ones that don't make it.

    S
     
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  4. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    That's a good idea about the R400s, Steve and, I'm guessing, a tad easier to
    load :D ... If memory serves, one is supposed to load true IR film in the dark (?)
    and, price wise, I think the difference is $2 and I'll definitely ask my mate (who does
    film processing) if there's anything special I should do or he should do? :)

    As for pics shown, here or on FB, worthy or not, they, usually, get posted :D

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  5. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Ilfosol 3 1:14, for 15', I think*. Treat as normal film. About 5' for R80s[ 1:9?].

    S

    *edit or 1:9 12'
     
  6. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Thanks Steve :). I know I don't have the cojones to try it myself :D

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  7. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    IR filters come in several types of which the 720nm* is the perhaps the most commonly used - essentially it cuts out almost all wavelengths shorter than 720nm (it does tend to let some through, perhaps 5-10 of the red end of the spectrum). A 760nm filter moves the transmission bandwidth further into the IR range and effectively eliminates all visible light transmission. Options also exist for 850, 950 and even 1000nm+ filters but these tend to be used only for scientific imaging and by real die hard enthusiasts as the exposures become increasingly lengthy even with the camera converted. Output is effectively mono only. 720nm is probably the highest value filter than can still be used for false colour images.

    There are other options too, 665 and 590nm IR filters allow more of the visible spectrum through and are better for 'false colour' images as they give brighter colours with more tonal range.

    *nm stands for nanometer (1 mn =1 billionth of a meter). the wavelength range of visdible light is aproximately 400-700nm (blue - red), above 700nm is the IR, below 400nm lies the UV.
     
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  8. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Wow, thanks Nigel :). I'm going to stop by my lab to see if they can do IR film processing and, if so, I may have to grow a pair :eek: .... :D

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  9. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Treat it just the same as ordinary film. You can put the filter on and off as you please from one frame to the next, with it off, the film just behaves as normal.

    rainy-day-pier-web.jpg ir-7-web.jpg

    Both Rollei IR, same roll, with and without filter. I think these were in Rodinal, but others work just as well. Better, in fact, I'm not keen on the amount of grain from Rodinal.

    S

    ps http://monochrome.me.uk/news/infrared-film/
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2018
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  10. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    The wavelength quoted is usually the point where the filter has 50% transmission, most long pass type filters have fairly rapid transactions going from basically no transmission to full transmission in around 30nm, my 960nm filter on the other hand is very gradual, with the transition takening several hundred nm.

    Quite a number of normal filters can be interesting with a 'full spectrum' converted camera generally they transmit quite a bit of IR while having their normal effect on the visible portion. Blue, green , magenta & variable ND filters have all worked well, as do some of the more specialist dual pass type such as Schott BG3. They could also work with film, but I suspect the exposures would be even more difficult to get right, and there's no way of telling the result till you've processed the film. (An EVF is a great bonus for IR!)
     
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  11. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Very cool, Steve :)

    Cheers and I think I feel some growth happening :D

    jack
     
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