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Coffee Chemistry

Discussion in 'Appraisal Gallery' started by tijotjc, Dec 24, 2015.

  1. tijotjc

    tijotjc Well-Known Member

    Camera: Nikon D5100
    Lens: Nikon AF-S Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G Dx

    [​IMG]

    Let me know your valuable thoughts :)
     
  2. luisport

    luisport Well-Known Member

    I see the shot much closer in.
     
  3. twists n turns

    twists n turns Well-Known Member

    Tricky angle etc to master and make it work.
    Im no lighting expert either but it really aint great im afraid :( Is it on-camera flash yeah/phone camera? I dont think youl ever pull off a shot like this with ocf.

    Anyhoo, the background and milk carton shadow is too distracting.
    The milk carton shouldn't even be in the shot imo. Some white milk pouring into shot is just dandy.
    ..We know what milk looks like ;)

    Lift the carton higher so your not getting the carton in the shot and get more level with the mug. .. Something along these lines-ish..

    [​IMG]



    ..and better lighting/sharper ofc.



    Then when you get it shiny enough - The wee splashes of coffee on the mug have to go. Nitpicking you might think but would be especially unacceptable for this kinda shot if thats what your going for. (Lose the bubbles too lol.)


    A top-down shot would be good for this setup but then even harder to light i imagine.


    jmho+2p
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2015
  4. MarcusT

    MarcusT Well-Known Member

    Have you thought about doing a long exposure on that?
     
  5. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    The more usual way to do that is by getting the coffee circulating first and then pouring (cream usually), so it circulates. This is just making a bit of a visual mess. Also need to avoid those shadows. Table top photography requires very controlled lighting and a pro would probably take several hours lighting and testing this for an advertising shot.
     
  6. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    My question is, did you employ a tripod?
     
  7. tijotjc

    tijotjc Well-Known Member

    [HR][/HR]
    No I did not, it was handheld shot
     
  8. tijotjc

    tijotjc Well-Known Member

    Unfortunately I am not a professional photographer. Thought the name of the forum was amateur photographer forum NOT, pro photographer forum :)
     
  9. tijotjc

    tijotjc Well-Known Member


    Thanks for your detailed analysis :)
    And I kind of like the bubbles in there ;)
     
  10. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    Very difficult then to get and keep focus where macro is concerned. I would suggest you buy one if you want to really improve your macro images. The 40mm macro lens is a good one to begin with. Read as much on the subject as you can - look at videos on YouTube for more help and advice. Photography is a wonderful and absorbing pastime but you can't expect to be good at it without heaps and heaps of practice and learning. Good luck.
     
  11. tijotjc

    tijotjc Well-Known Member

    First of all, thanks to everyone who replied. Let me explain the shot a little bit: This was taken while my wife was making coffee and I decided to test my new macro lens, nothing more than that :)
    I did not think much about the lighting or the composition, was just a spur of the moment think. IMHO, I thought that it was good enough to be appraised. Apparently I was wrong :(

    Again thanking you for your valuable responses.
     
  12. tijotjc

    tijotjc Well-Known Member

    Thanks Mike:eek:
     
  13. twists n turns

    twists n turns Well-Known Member

    Second thoughts ..yeah ... long live the bubbles!!
     
  14. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    But what did you expect in the way of appraisal? It's an interesting subject, competently shot. But it's something we've all seen a thousand times, and it's not really very interesting. As a test of a new macro lens, it's excellent, but that's about all anyone can say for it.

    As for "Unfortunately I am not a professional photographer. Thought the name of the forum was amateur photographer forum NOT, pro photographer forum", well, yes, I fully take your point that it's actually quite a bit more interesting than a poor amateur attempt to re-create a generic professional swirling-cream shot, but it also points to a more general question on the difference between "amateur" and "professional. Surely an amateur should aspire to being at least as good as the average professional, but with more freedom.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  15. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    There is nothing that is too bad to be appraised. This is a good standard to appraise, but as Roger suggests, the range of comments are going to be limited and overall negative, given as you say, you applied no thought to it.
    There are a vast number of amateurs who would be very offended at the suggestion that they are somehow not up the level of professionals in many genres. But in all cases we try to learn something from them, which is about the same for golf, tennis and a lot more activities where there are pro / am strata.
     
  16. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    There is nothing that is too bad to be appraised. This is a good standard to appraise, but as Roger suggests, the range of comments are going to be limited and overall negative, given as you say, you applied no thought to it.
    There are a vast number of amateurs who would be very offended at the suggestion that they are somehow not up the level of professionals in many genres, but in most cases we try to learn something from them. But AP declined to start a Beginner Appraisals section, so it all gets mixed in together.
     

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