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CD help

Discussion in 'Computer Related Help & Discussion' started by spinno, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    I put some photos on a CD for my brother many years ago. He's come back to me saying he can't access them on his computer. I've tried on mine (W10), it recognises there's something on the disc (through Properties) but offers to format the disc. These photos are very special as they are of my nephew when he was aged between 0-5 and unfortunately they were all on my hard drive that got mashed a few years ago.
    Any suggestions?
    I do have an old XP laptop and also an old CD/DVD writer/rewriter and did wonder if I could try to do something on these
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    They don't last forever. I don't know offhand if the DVD drives in modern computers will read all CDs - there were some different formats. If you have any others from that vintage you could try to read them. That might help decide if the reader won't work with CDs or whether the CD itself has had it. I don't think I've used one in ten years.
     
  3. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    The discs do degenerate, quite quickly in some cases, I certainly wouldn't choose them as a long-term storage option. There were some gold discs from Kodak and some with black on the business side from Fuji which I believe are more stable than the general run.
     
  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I hope that you find a solution. It is worth noting that CD's were seen as "long term" storage when the alternative was floppy disks or magnetic tape. All digital archive material should be copied to new media in time. This was very necessary when tape was used because it "printed through" and got corrupted but it applies to all things. So even if you use external hard-disk(s) for back-up you should still replace them every now and then (verifying the copy).
     
  5. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Presently trying one or two things.
    It's great that the drives can't read the files but knows they're there:rolleyes:
    Puts me in mind of Brexit
     
    peterba likes this.
  6. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Try recovery software. I used to do this on cds and dvds that could not be read by Windows.
     
  7. Derek W

    Derek W Well-Known Member

    From the sounds of it (windows offering to reformat) you didn't "finalise" the disc after putting the pictures on it.
     
  8. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    yup.
    Tried old xp laptop, again it knew there was something there but couldn't identify file type. I have more time today so I will try other suggestions.
    Thanks for all the replies so far.
     
  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    You mean it can see the files on the disk but doesn't know what to do with them? The file-type - in the sense that the file is named in windows convention is just a convenience that windows uses to link files with applications. If the computer can see the file and information such as file-size then you should be able to copy it as long as there are no physical faults.

    Going way back into the mists of time the only knowledge of file type needed was whether a file was text (ascii) or binary. This is because files were written sequentially and terminated with an end-of-file marker. If the copy was not told that the file was binary (i.e. not ascii) the copy would stop at the first occurrence of EOF (^Z).

    I'd expect an old CD is also written sequentially but I'd expect the file start and end points to be recorded as information on the disk. If I remember correctly a disk image was prepared then burned. The first disks had to be finalised to be readable but later, if I remember correctly, this became optional and you could have more than one write to a disk.
     
  10. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    You mean, you're going to "take back control" of those files? ;)

    BTW, did you get my PM about file recovery?
     
  11. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Yes on both counts thank you very much. However I could be prorogued on the taking back control....
     
    peterba likes this.
  12. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Well, getting those files back should be "the easiest thing in the world"... :D
     
    Zou, DaveM399 and spinno like this.
  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

  14. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    I used to use IsoBuster, but probably 8 years ago when it was free.
     
  15. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    How did it go, David?
     
  16. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    still a work in progress...
     
    peterba likes this.
  17. RobertCoombes

    RobertCoombes Well-Known Member

    i am pretty certain that my negatives will outlast my disk drives.
     
  18. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Does look that way
     
  19. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Nothing is forthcoming, just have to write it off....:(
     

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