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Bring back slavery!

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Roger Hicks, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. willie45

    willie45 Well-Known Member

    That's in reference to a parable and isn't referring to money.
     
  2. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    That is quite a complement to Trump to suggest that he thinks before tweeting.
     
    spinno and Roger Hicks like this.
  3. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Perhaps I should have thought about that before I posted..☺
     
  4. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    It appears that Govan's most famous son, Rab C Nesbitt is alive and well and living in France under a pseudonym:)
     
  5. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Mike,

    Och, no. I did live on Clydeside for a while, though, and I still go there from time to time: when my mother died, my father remarried a few years later, and his widow (technically, I suppose, my stepmother) still lives in Kilmacolm.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  6. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    Try telling that to a lot of people!

    Lynn
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  7. willie45

    willie45 Well-Known Member

    Just because there are some dumb people around who don't understand a thing, doesn't make it untrue I'm afraid.
     
  8. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/inflationandpriceindices/timeseries/czbh/mm23
    https://www.gov.uk/government/history/past-prime-ministers
    If one prints off the rpi graph and then annotates it with the guilty prime ministers then it becomes clear which party messes up worst.
     
  9. Malcolm_Stewart

    Malcolm_Stewart Well-Known Member

    Of your list of Prime Ministers, I've seen just two in the flesh - Sir Alec Douglas-Home in Clapham, campaigning in the 1964 election. No security from what I remember, and access to Downing Street was still permitted. Much later, Harold Wilson at the OU.
     
  10. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Once the governors lock themselves away from the governed you know it can only go downhill.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  11. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    There's a thread around here about coincidences: and here's one because I was there for Harold Wilson's appearance. Robin Day was knocking about quite near to me, and oh, what a poseur. I was working at 85 Fleet St at the time and living just off Northcote Road.
     
  12. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    There are more than enough ministers and their 'flocks' around who 'interpret'/bend religious texts to suit their own agendas. Are you one of those claiming to know what this particular disciple really meant?

    Lynn
     
  13. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    I met Harold Wilson in 1970?. He came to Nottingham during the election and turned up at the local Councillor's house and pressed the flesh with all and sundry gathered around the terraced two up two down. Security what was that! One policeman trying to deal with a gaggle of excitable kids and a few adults ooh and just one reporter from the local paper with a photographer!!
     
  14. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    Let me tell you a true story.

    In December 1982 I started a new job. On the day that I started the company's internal auditors issued an absolutely damning report on the department that I had been hired to run. For the next six months all the published management information on my department told a sorry (but slowly improving) tale. My fault? I don't think so.

    See the parallel? I think that your suggestion can be put fairly and squarely into the 'bad science' box.

    MickLL

    PS I knew in advance what was going to happen on the day I started. I had been called in, the situation explained to me, and given the opportunity of pulling out of the job.

    PPS I met and worked with Blair on a number of occasions.Although I very frequently had profound disagreements with him I still found our interactions a pleasure.
     
    RovingMike likes this.
  15. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Not really. I was there. The overriding reason why inflation took off under Heath was the unbridled and irresponsible power of the unions, who had rejected any form of accountability under Barbara Castle's Penal Clauses in the previous Government.. Subsequently Grinning Jim, was even less able to control them and in fact they controlled him, compelling the country to call in Mrs T to inject some sanity. Sorry, that's what happened, but feel free (as I know you do) to re-write history any way you like.
     
    SqueamishOssifrage likes this.
  16. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Would be a good idea if anyone wanting to comment on events that were so clear to us all 40 years ago, but appear to be prone to reinterpretation any way that some individuals see fit (or to suit their present agenda), were to read things like this: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/cabinetpapers/alevelstudies/1960-radicalisation.htm

    This looks very flat and fair to me, but I know will not fit with the imaginings of some.
     
  17. willie45

    willie45 Well-Known Member

    I'm sure Mr Trump has some sort of basis for his beliefs but it doesn't make them right. I'm not really sure how to clarify further on my post no 87.
     
  18. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    This is one thing on which we agree. The union leaders were on a collision course with reality and Thatcher was the immovable object. It would be foolish to argue that her strategy and tactics were wrong or to deny that many people whose natural home was Labour were quite pleased to see her crush the (then) out of control unions. The problem was that she went on to impose the "property owning democracy". It actually should have been a good thing but Thatcher pushed it through without thinking out the consequences. The supremely stupid insistence that the proceeds of council house sales NOT be invested in new stock was wrong in terms of both economics and social responsibility and has dumped us in the mess we now see. Her successors seem determined to continue her mistakes by taking us fast forward to the 18th century with the insane way in which they have implemented universal non-credit - another botched but basically good idea.
     
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  19. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Andrew,

    Exactly. Here's a parallel. A surgical operation can do a lot of good. But if, after that, you continue to lop bits off purely to suit your personal biases, you quite soon do more harm than good.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
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  20. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Mike,

    Sure. It's not bad for an A level presentation. But many people study many things beyond A level.

    Cheers,

    R.
     

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