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Bosses

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Catriona, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. LesleySM

    LesleySM Well-Known Member

    Well did she?

    And where is he now?
     
  2. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I think I was just born to be a problem solver or just to get my head down to work on something challenging. I guess I could never understand people who didn't feel the same way but I managed, adequately.
     
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  3. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I remember a recent incident when someone (?an inspector?) sat in his car as a constable went to tackle someone and was stabbed. Makes me wonder about his entry level (and lack of responsibility and guts).
     
  4. LesleySM

    LesleySM Well-Known Member

    Fast track NHS managers are mostly a bane of the lower ranks life. One who wasn't actually too bad told me at their level to stay in the same place for more than 18 months is seen as letting your career "stagnate" so in 10 years I went through 3 general managers (at least they're so high up the chain minions don't normally have anything to do with them), 9 service managers and 5 service delivery managers (the last post wasn't around for around 6 years or there would have been more)

    Every new manager has to make some sort of "change"- usually without reason but as a colleague of mine put it, "new managers making change is the management equivalent of a new dog in town p***ing on lampposts, its how they mark their territory"
     
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  5. Malcolm_Stewart

    Malcolm_Stewart Well-Known Member

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't many of these fast track ideas come out of Harvard Business School? Perhaps OK for the US, and for their model of "business" ?
     
  6. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Yes and still on firearms
     
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  7. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I've come across several "managers" who were very good at managing their careers and nothing else. On the other hand I've come across quite a few who were hopeless technically (including one who needed regular handholding to deal with his email) but first class at organising their staff and getting the job done on time and in budget. I think it's obvious which of them I preferred. :D
     
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  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Nige,

    I hope he did not phrase it quite that politely.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
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  9. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I would imagine he would be as professional as possible.:)
     
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  10. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Full disclosure: I haven't been a wage slave since 1980. On the other hand I have been a freelance since 1980 and have therefore had lots of "bosses".

    For me, the "f*ck you" quotient has always been important. You don't usually have to phrase it quite like that but equally I twice suggested that if they didn't like what I was doing, or the way I was doing it, they could either fire me (once) or accept my resignation (the other time). On both occasions, they declined. Since I turned freelance, most bad editors (not all) accepted my approach and I finished the contract/delivered the goods. Two or three others accepted that I quit, on agreed terms (neither wholly mine nor wholly theirs).

    Certainly, I never encountered the sort of thing Lesley is talking about, not even at second hand. Start screaming at me and you will very soon be told where to go. The closest I ever came was when I had been teaching for a couple of years and had my first "In Service Training Day". I pointed out quite politely to the lecturer that she had just said A, but that she had also said B a few minutes before and that And and B were incompatible. She started blustering and was quite upset when I pointed out very politely that she was talking nonsense and that she knew it. She turned up for the only teaching assessment I ever had and decided that I had failed. It was the last day of the teaching year with a ROSLA (Raising of the School Leaving Age) class: kids who had always thought they would be leaving school at 15 but were being kept on until 16. I resigned (example 2 above).

    After escalating pleas from the headmaster I stayed on for another term.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
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  11. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    I have been in that position. As most regulars might have noticed I am a bit of a nerd, maybe with more than a touch of autism. I knew some of the 'theory of management' of the time and even scored a top grade in OU's Management Within Organisations course. I managed not to be a disaster but I was not comfortable in the position. Managing a department was frustrating to me because I prefered to do rather thanto manage. I guess that some of my staff would also have be frustrated.The department was electronics, which came under manufacturing development. I knew little about electronics but knew more than most about embedded microprocessors. The projects at the time were using microprocessors before the time when you could just buy modules in and use them. My own manager , who sadly died shortly before he was due to retire was very good indeed. His solution was to do a bit of empire building.He founded a new department managed by myself with only one member of staff who was someone very similar to myself. He accepted my suggestion as to who was best suited to run the larger department, and we, between us, got some very impressive projects onto the factory floor.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  12. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    I encountered this type of attitude, just once in my career. While in my early twenties (and still a trainee), I was shouted at by an overbearing senior member of staff (an ex-military fella :rolleyes:). In return, I offered him my 'thoughts' - at about 90 decibels, and liberally laced with Anglo Saxon terms. ;)

    I fully expected, after this, to be called in by the boss of the company, to be told that my services were no longer required. However, to my surprise, that didn't happen. Moreover, the 'shouty' bloke's attitude toward me changed completely, and he became almost annoyingly cheery and friendly. :confused:

    I worked there for a few more months after that, until I eventually decided to leave. The incident was never mentioned again.
     
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  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Such people are surprisingly common and they often respond the way your specimen did. I'm sure some psychologist could explain it in terms of fight or flight responses... :confused:
     
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  14. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Simple bully reaction, if they know they can't intimidate you they stop trying.
     
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  15. RobertCoombes

    RobertCoombes Well-Known Member

    I became a boss by accident; our boss was promoted. I was wearing two hats; Computer Systems Manager and Senior Engineering Analyst. I had known and worked with the whole team and so we just carried on as before; no shouting or indeed any friction. I did get a nice office.
    Wimpey1.jpg
     
  16. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I got a nice office too - but preferred to work in the open plan and leave my office for the many impromptu meetings that seemed to be needed.

    MickLL
     
  17. Malcolm_Stewart

    Malcolm_Stewart Well-Known Member

    Personal offices went out of favour years ago, but they did have their uses. I could discuss private and personal matters without it being obvious. Booking an "interview room" made the whole matter much slower, and more difficult to resolve. But "walls have ears" so even offices can't be trusted for everything.
     
  18. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Not to mention, one hell of a bow tie.:D;)
     
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  19. RobertCoombes

    RobertCoombes Well-Known Member

    The other side of the door was a 36 inch plotter that had an apatite for loose ties. I still have over 59 bows, All huge. Still wearing them ..sometimes,
     
  20. RobertCoombes

    RobertCoombes Well-Known Member

    Just to clarify all my bows are DIY; no caddish clip-ons.
     
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