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Bosses

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Catriona, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I've never had a really bad boss although a guy two levels above was difficult. Part of his job was to approve project budgets and he would delight in being as difficult (and rude) as he could. He would never, ever, allow a contingency sum to be included. He would go through a budget line by line asking questions. Some questions were good, some were dumb but he did what needed to be done although he could be unpleasant about it. Luckily he was based in New York and I was traveling the world so I rarely had to meet him. He never seemed to cotton on to the fact that those of us who developed project budgets would put in something for him to find (and take out) but hide a small contingency which, at least in my case, he never found.

    More to the point I hope that I've never been a bad boss. Yes I've been tough on occasions but (I hope) always fair. I learned early on (as somebody has already said in this thread) that if you deal with the weak link then typically the rest of the team will be glad.

    I've never ever come across (or even heard) the sort of situation that Lesley desribes.

    MickLL
     
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  2. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Just a little giggle.
    When in the RAF, I had two bosses in the Missile squadron where I worked and they were called O'nion and Bean. It always made me smile to myself!
     
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  3. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    My sister absolutely swears that her music teacher was called Melody Beat.

    MickLL
     
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  4. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I remember being in hospital once with a lovely Scottish lady in the bed opposite. We did the crosswords individually in competition with each other. She was as feisty as me and after helping her get dressed (big cast on her leg) she demanded escape from Raigmore hospital (awful place), called her daughter and went, much to my disappointment (I still had three days to go).
    She was Scottish and her surname was English! Ha!
     
  5. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    For nomative determinism it's hard to beat Les McBurney, who of course became a fire fighter.
     
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  6. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I used to have a colleague whose name was Dick O’Nions. He used to hate being called Dick Onions
     
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  7. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Oh yes! They get very touchy about it. Brought tears to my eyes sometimes... Ha!
     
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  8. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    :D
     
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  9. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Worst boss I ever had was drunk every afternoon and had a hangover every morning. She had been parachuted in from Univac to run our department and successfully destroyed it. It was not long after that that I left to run my own business which was then gifted to my son so that he could do the job properly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
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  10. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    First ever supervisor was a brat, maybe just a couple of years older than me but her mum was the manager and she thought she could get away with anything. Never saw any supervisory skill in her.

    Had one manager who never communicated effectively, only told you what was wrong. Also fiddled disciplinary notes to add in things not discussed to fast track dismissals. This only affected me insomuch as when I do disciplinary meetings I make sure both parties have notes so there's full transparency.

    Another was a textbook bully. Never yelled at me but regularly at others. Tried to discourage email communications because he always preferred not to have evidence/paper trail. The email paper trail saved me once as he tried to get me fired for his failings; on presentation of evidence by myself the whole thing was dropped immediately.

    Other than that just a couple of incompetent managers who clearly had bluffed their way to high places (and didn't hold them for long).
     
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  11. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    This comment caused me to stop and think about just how many times in my career I saw this happen. So many supposed 'high-fliers' - each arriving with a great flourish, and soon disappearing without trace. They were never missed.
     
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  12. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    One thing I do know is that managing others isn't easy. I've been pushed into management roles 5 times in my working life and each one's been a bloody disaster. That's why I'm always pleasantly surprised by good managers and happy to sing their praises.
     
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  13. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    There's a common misconception based on hierarchy that as one develops skills and responsibilities one must automatically become a people manager. For those with the appropriate skills managing others is generally a walk in the park, whereas for those without, see most of this thread. ;)
     
  14. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    And it's really, really hard to manage people well if your own boss is the boss from hell. That's when it's time to move, in my experience.
     
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  15. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    That's exactly what I had in my last post in the local Council. What bugged me, was after I begged early retirement on the grounds of hubby's health, the infuriating boss above me also retired! I really had to go, otherwise I think I would have ended up doing him damage!

    I totally agree with Zou about managers. I reckon they are born to it. I was so-so, but never awful, I hope. I really preferred the work angle, problems? Great! Setting up new systems? Great. Day to day maintenance? Boring boring. I remember being parachuted into a job in BA along with my immediate manager and also his. Things hadn't been going too well in that department, so we had a real task on our hands. It was absolutely brilliant work for the first 6 months. After that, I just waited for something to go wrong. It seldom did.
     
  16. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    It will be interesting to see how many people who are currently on the direct entry scheme to the police at Inspector rank and above are either.
    A) Effective at what they do
    B) Still in role

    From what I can gather, neither A nor B has positive answers.
     
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  17. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    On a direct entry scheme to Inspector level? Oh, they'll know all about what it is like for all those below them, won't they? Unreal! :rolleyes:
     
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  18. Malcolm_Stewart

    Malcolm_Stewart Well-Known Member

    I'm now realising that in my near 40 years in the defence avionics industry (GEC Marconi Avionics and many other names, but essentially the same team) I was blessed with good managers - apart from one guy who had to manage me for a few years because my immediate boss had taken early retirement.

    My first boss was a woman, and she was excellent at keeping emotion out of the day-to-day running of the department. I do remember a decent "Personnel" department in the 1960s morph into the fashionable "Human Resources" department, staffed with young female graduates who knew very little about industry - and why should they? It takes time... and that's one thing they didn't have, nor could they, because they were quickly off to wreak havoc in another area.
     
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  19. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Yep. A good idea. The government are full of them.

    One of my friends on firearms was at an incident and there was an inspector sat in one of the passenger seats of a divisional car, whilst everyone else was doing their bit. He was told that she was a direct entry inspector and was observing /being mentored. He went to the car, asked if she had a warrant card, she told him she had. He said to her that she was therefore a sworn constable and she could get out of the car and help.
     
  20. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure that's true. I joined a company as a 'management trainee' (with all that implied!!) . I was put in charge of the lab. with four metallurgists and about 10 inspectors (I'm a mathematician/physicist). I quickly learned the inspection job - very easy - but no way could I ever learn the metallurgy. At least not enough of it. I reckon that I was a pretty poor man manager in that job. Later, after lots more experience and a few courses, I reckon that I improved a lot. I was never the leader that folk would follow over a cliff but at least my departments seemed to run well and the guys and gals seemed happy enough. I had to work very hard to implement some tough decisions - never enjoyed that bit but it had to be done. Certainly I wasn't born to that bit!!!

    MickLL
     
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