1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Battery chargers

Discussion in 'AP Magazine Feedback & Suggestions' started by mfc, Aug 5, 2016.

  1. mfc

    mfc Member

    Minor comment ... review in AP 6 August p46 comments that the "Twist Plus+ doesn't give the option to plug in an additional mains lead". I've replaced both my mains-lead-attached battery chargers with USB-attached chargers: they are half the weight and almost half the thickness, and of course allow the battery to be charged from any USB source (including computers, devices such as the Twist Plus+, and 'power banks'). I no longer carry mains leads.

    Might be worth an item/article in AP describing these USB battery chargers, since apparently they are not well-known?

    Mike

    PS: example of the many available: https://www.amazon.co.uk/vhbw-CHARGER-BATTERIES-BP-2L12-BP-2L13/dp/B017BB5FNC
     
  2. Andy Westlake

    Andy Westlake AP Staff

    These USB chargers are certainly interesting products. We don't often review accessories that don't come through conventional UK import and distribution channels, but might make an exception in this case.
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    When I did a search for a charger to help Malcolm with his Fuji query ONLY usb chargers came to light. I don't know how much current you can pull from a USB port but it must take a lot of time to charge a battery
     
  4. mfc

    mfc Member

    I didn't check for 'conventional' channels for these, sorry. Quite possibly exist.
     
  5. Andy Westlake

    Andy Westlake AP Staff

    Depending on the charger plug, you can pull up to 2A through USB. Charge times are entirely reasonable; I use the Ansmann Powerline Vario universal charger a lot, simply because it can charge the battery on almost any camera I'm reviewing, and draws its power from a standard USB output.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/ANSMANN-Powerline-Australia-traveller-batteries/dp/B00TTON62C

    BTW there are plenty of 240V third-party Fujifilm chargers, such as this one from Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/DSTE-NP-W126-Rechargeable-Battery-Fujifilm/dp/B00HZH6BB8

    These things are pretty generic: essentially they have a block with the charging circuitry, with an interchangeable battery adapter plate on top. So you can probably even mix and match between USB and main charging.
     
  6. mfc

    mfc Member

    From a standard USB port (on a small laptop, for example) you would get 0.5A. However, chargers meant for tablets, etc., can deliver much more. The USB charger I mentioned earlier will happily draw almost an amp (4.5W, delivering perhaps 80% of that), so charges my camera batteries in roughly the same time as the 'mains cable' official charger (which delivers 3.6W). If one already is carrying the USB charger and USB cable, there's a huge saving in bulk and weight. The one I linked to above weighs 33g, for instance.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2016
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    You got me confused now. That ansman surely is a mains charger? I have a mains charger for my ipad that the ipad standard usb cable fits in. Connect that same cable to a usb port on my mac and it says "connected but not charging" although over 24 hours it will gain charge.
     
  8. Andy Westlake

    Andy Westlake AP Staff

    The Ansmann Powerline Vario comes with a mains adapter block that has multiple region interchangeable plugs, but all it does is provide a standard 5V 1A USB output. The universal charger section works off this, via a standard micro USB input. So it can run off any standard 5V USB power supply, including in-car adapters (one is included) and powerbanks.

    When it comes to charging speed, it's the amps output that's critical. Laptops often only output 0.5A, which is fine for powering external hard drives and so on, but not great for charging anything. Li-ion or AA battery chargers will be much happier with a 1A output; tablets tend to need 2A output to charge in any reasonable amount of time, as they have much higher capacity batteries.
     
  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Thank you for clearing that up. So it is a bit semantic. For most practical purposes you'd plug it in the wall. You have the flexibility to plug it in a car that comes with separating the transformer from the charger, but it doesn't work by plugging into a computer. The 'USB' is that it uses 5V rather than 12V or something else and uses the connector you'd ordinarily stick in a computer for data transfer.
     
  10. Andy Westlake

    Andy Westlake AP Staff

    Yes, that's broadly correct. However it can work by plugging it into a computer, just relatively slowly; but the same is true of many of the myriad devices now available that use USB charging. The term is far more about the connector and output standards than it is about computer ports.
     

Share This Page