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Another Pink/Purple one?

Discussion in 'Appraisal Gallery' started by AdrianSadlier, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. AdrianSadlier

    AdrianSadlier Well-Known Member

    [​IMG]

    Foxglove by Adrian Sadlier, on Flickr

    A foxglove, nearly finished blooming. But still beautiful.

    Taken in my sisters garden in natural light.

    + or -
     
  2. Raza Shaikh

    Raza Shaikh Active Member

    Beautiful Shot!
     
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  3. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Nice one. Might be better to remove the intrusive bit of whatever it is that's at the top of the central bloom though...
     
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  4. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Levels. sharpness:

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Levels and sharpness have improved matters for me but I'm still not quite 'buying' the black background. The cut out looks artificial in places (lower left of stem esp.) and the lighting in some areas (particularly in the leaves/unopened buds at the top of the plant) makes it feel wrong with the black behind it. The whole just doesn't look as if there was enough contrast in the light to make this work. Sorry to be the voice of dissent!
     
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  6. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Ok, i will 'fess up. I saw the title and thought 'Oooh, matron!'

    Adrian
     
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  7. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    You're not the voice of dissent. Compare to some of the other pictures, the cutout on this is very obviously a cut out. It's very sharp at the edges, ragged in places. It's unconvincing (or at least, it's obviously a cut out rather than entertaining the possibility of a flower shot on a black background).
     
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  8. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Really doesn't look cut out to me. Maybe the old eyes are not back to strength. What does Adrian say?
     
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  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I only know it is a cut-out because of the series and, because it is not a studio image, setting a perfect matt black background in the field doesn't strike me as easy to achieve.

    I'd quite like to see this on "white" to see how that changes the impact. A white background must also be a heck of a lot cheaper to print!
     
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  10. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    I still think the bottom left looks wrong, and the edges are just too bright so they don't look as though the light has properly wrapped around.
     
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  11. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    The bright white edges are more evident in the sharpened version. It might be possible (though time consuming) to go around and gently 'colour in' the edges, but first I'd layer up a sharpened version over a non-sharpened version and use a mask to brush away the very harsh edges. Then do a bit of gentle colourisation where the highlit edges are less convincing. Might work.
     
  12. AdrianSadlier

    AdrianSadlier Well-Known Member

    Guys.

    As ever, thanks for the feedback. Sorry for not responding before now but I was on a loooong weekend with Monica in Madrid - only back into the house an hour (don't expect many photos - I was with Monica, not my camera, although it did sneak its way into my hand luggage!).

    As mentioned before, its not a "cut out" but a burn in - I darken the background until it is black. Usually working between 750% and 1500% magnification.

    So the edges are accurate in so far as they are where they should be. I think the "fault" lies in the DOF. As the image sharpness falls away (as in bottom left) there should be a natural blending in of the foreground to background. This results in an incongruous transition from colour to black. I think a greater DOF would have worked better to allow for a cleaner edge. At least I think that is the solution.

    The problem is most of these images have been taken hand held in natural light, outdoors. A longer exposure with a tripod is not necessarily the solution - the blooms move too much with the slightest puff of wind.

    What I think I need to do is to revisit the garden centre this summer on bright, calm days with a tripod and maybe even a black card. Trouble is, that means I can no longer do it "slyly" - it will require permission (maybe a "sharing" of the images for limited use by the garden centre might be a possibility). Up until now I have tried to edit selected images from my back catalogue to achieve the results I want. I am coming to the conclusion that this will only work on a few that luckily meet the criteria I need for the series.

    And by the way, I will always leave a "flaw" in the image - something that prevents it being "perfect" as that is how I want to depict the natural beauty of how I found the plant.

    All suggestions and feedback welcomed as ever. And the more suggestions for getting the image right "in camera" the better - it takes a long time to draw the back background, especially as I use a mouse and not a tablet and pen (although this is on my "lust list").

    Thanks again.

    Adrian
     
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  13. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Are you absolutely wedded to the idea of shooting these 'in natural light'? I just wondered because you're already using a conceit of sorts in that the black background is added in after. It would be possible to get the black background much more easily if you were able to control the light indoors. Which would also solve the problem of things moving in the breeze. Unless the light is right, even using a black card is not necessarily going to give you the black background you're after, particularly if it is as 'well' lit as the flower and close to it, unless you are a stickler for waiting for the right light. And I suspect that was the issue here - the light that we can see on the very edges of the plant is working against the idea that it was sitting in a pool of darkness. To make life much easier for yourself you really need to try and make it so that you can have the plant be in different light than the background. I'm on a very short break between 'shifts' so I haven't time just now but I have a oucle of examples that I could use to show you what I mean if you like? No offence if you don't like btw!!!!!
     
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  14. AdrianSadlier

    AdrianSadlier Well-Known Member

    I prefer natural light for all photography, not just this series. I'd be interested in seeing the examples when you get a chance. No rush - I'm tied up with work most days now :(

    I just posted another plant shot, natural light, "normal" background.
     

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