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Thread: Choices

  1. #1
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    Choices

    Please help to settle a niggling argument

    You have to decide on an event which can have one of two outcomes A or B

    do you have one choice or two choices?

    In other words is the choice A OR B (one choice)
    or is it choice 1 = A AND choice 2 = B (two choices)

  2. #2
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    Re: Choices

    Two possibilities, one choice.
    If you're not living on the edge, you're wasting space

  3. #3
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    Re: Choices

    You have one choice. There is a choice of two outcomes.

  4. #4
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    Re: Choices

    Quote Originally Posted by mike_j View Post
    Please help to settle a niggling argument

    You have to decide on an event which can have one of two outcomes A or B

    do you have one choice or two choices?

    In other words is the choice A OR B (one choice)
    or is it choice 1 = A AND choice 2 = B (two choices)
    Depends on how many goes you get...
    Nick

    "Photography is lies" - Bailey
    "Few artists are much more than halfway sane" - Roger Hicks

    The Blog is (coming) back http://www.nbrphoto.net/blog/

  5. #5
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    Re: Choices

    Or unless it's locked in a box, in which case it's both outcomes until you look

  6. #6
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    Re: Choices

    Schrödinger's cat?
    Malcolm Stewart


    Jaguar Mk VII

  7. #7
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    Re: Choices

    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm_Stewart View Post
    Schrödinger's cat?
    That was what I thought

  8. #8
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    Re: Choices

    Quote Originally Posted by MartyG View Post
    Or unless it's locked in a box, in which case it's both outcomes until you look
    I got quite perturbed and ended up running around in little circles thinking about the superposition of quantum states...

    ... in fact, I got into a Schrödinger's cat-flap!
    Simon

    My flickr galleries at www.flickr.com/photos/sis-exposures/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/sis-exposures/

  9. #9
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    Re: Choices

    You also have the choice not to choose.

    Your wording was also:
    "You have to decide on an event which can have one of two outcomes A or B"
    so
    you have to make the decision on an event.

    One choice.

    But also
    Do it - or not?
    Two choices!
    The outcome depends on your choice...........

    Choose and the outcome is still A or B
    Choose not to choose?
    Hmm!
    Catriona .......... My Flickr http://www.flickr.com/people/kate_ferris/

  10. #10
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    Re: Choices

    Until you take the choice, you have both A and B. But after the choice has been taken you had either choice A or B. So prior to action being taken, you had two courses of action to choose between, but after you only have single choices, which was the one taken and the one not taken...

    Mmmm, temporal verbs.
    Last edited by Atavar; 09-05-2012 at 07:38.
    LesleySM: "Nah guess we're JNFAPF (just normal for APforums)"

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    nikonypenlympmix user

  11. #11
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    Re: Choices

    Better than the options left to Mr Hobson.
    Ted ACLSFBRIPN
    My Blog: http://tedspics.wordpress.com/
    Updated 17th August 2014

  12. #12
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    Re: Choices

    What about proportional representation?
    David
    -----------------------------------------------
    We are here to learn.
    Some things are relevant, some aren't...just rejoice in the fact that at least you seem to have the choice to decide which is which.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinno1001 http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinno1001

  13. #13
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    Re: Choices

    Talking of choice/s......

    I note Round 4 of APOY is:

    At dawn and dusk.

    Now, is someone looking for a merged two image composite?
    Do we have two choices?
    Do I?
    Catriona .......... My Flickr http://www.flickr.com/people/kate_ferris/

  14. #14
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    Re: Choices

    English (or, at least, the people who speak it!) tends to be remarkably casual about "either", "and, "or", "neither", "nor" and such words. How the words should be used in their strict logical sense is best demonstrated using truth tables. In the following examples there are two inputs, A and B, whose condition is either a logic 0 or logic 1 (or False or True, if you prefer). Truth tables are a quick way of summarising all possible states of a logic circuit - here the two binary inputs mean that there are four possible input combinations, hence four lines in the following tables.

    AND:
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 0
    1 0 0
    1 1 1

    OR:
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 1

    EXCLUSIVE OR (which is EITHER A OR B, but not both together):
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 0

    NOR (which is NOT OR i.e. the inverse output of OR):
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 1
    0 1 0
    1 0 0
    1 1 0

    NAND (which is NOT AND i.e. the inverse output of AND)
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 1
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 0

    These are the basic building blocks of most logic circuits, including computers.

    The situation you have described is the OR scenario. The confusion arises because you have said that you can choose A and B but, of course, you can't - you are betting on the outcome, which can only be A or B. In other words, you have two choices (because there are two possible outcomes), but this means that you are always choosing A OR B, and can never choose A AND B.
    John

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/john_gass http://www.flickr.com/photos/john_gass

  15. #15
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    Re: Choices

    Quote Originally Posted by john_g View Post
    English (or, at least, the people who speak it!) tends to be remarkably casual about "either", "and, "or", "neither", "nor" and such words. How the words should be used in their strict logical sense is best demonstrated using truth tables. In the following examples there are two inputs, A and B, whose condition is either a logic 0 or logic 1 (or False or True, if you prefer). Truth tables are a quick way of summarising all possible states of a logic circuit - here the two binary inputs mean that there are four possible input combinations, hence four lines in the following tables.

    AND:
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 0
    1 0 0
    1 1 1

    OR:
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 1

    EXCLUSIVE OR (which is EITHER A OR B, but not both together):
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 0

    NOR (which is NOT OR i.e. the inverse output of OR):
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 1
    0 1 0
    1 0 0
    1 1 0

    NAND (which is NOT AND i.e. the inverse output of AND)
    A B OUTPUT
    0 0 1
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 0

    These are the basic building blocks of most logic circuits, including computers.

    The situation you have described is the OR scenario. The confusion arises because you have said that you can choose A and B but, of course, you can't - you are betting on the outcome, which can only be A or B. In other words, you have two choices (because there are two possible outcomes), but this means that you are always choosing A OR B, and can never choose A AND B.
    Bravo!
    Nice one John.
    I'm reminded of using Cobol, which used to give me great pleasure in the use of logic in the 1980s! lol
    Catriona .......... My Flickr http://www.flickr.com/people/kate_ferris/

  16. #16
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    Re: Choices

    Herein lies the difference between a Boolean and a single bit.

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